prickly poppy

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prickly poppy

prickly poppy

WARNING Very sharp thistle-like prickly stems and leaves, so it’s best to wear very thick gloves when handling. White flowers with yellow center are up to 5 inches (13 cm) across and have 6, large, tissue-paper-like petals. From a distance, the flowers look like fried eggs. Stems contain white latex that you can apply to warts moles skin cancer to help eat them away. Considered poisonous when fresh, boiling recommended. The upper part of the plant is sometimes crushed and dried to make a mild sedative, contains a very minute amount of opium so it's a relaxant, helps sleep (all poppies do, even the red and orange ones). The seeds contain toxic alkaloids that sometimes cause glaucoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Wu, "Cytotoxic benzophenanthridine and benzylisoquinoline alkaloids from Argemone mexicana," Zeitschriftfur Naturforschung C, vol.
Mroczek, "Application of hydrostatic CCC-TLC-HPLC-ESI-TOF-MS for the bioguided fractionation of anticholinesterase alkaloids from Argemone mexicana L.
a) Fruto de Argemone platyceras, b) Frutos de Solanum rostratum, c) Vainas de los granos de Avena sativa frente a la madriguera de una ardilla, d) Cuartos inferiores y cola de un juvenil de Peromyscus maniculatus.
The genus Argemone is very rich in alkaloids, which have both pharmaceutical and pest control properties.
Argemonine and norargemonine were isolated from Argemone hispida in 1951 (Schermerhorn and Soine 1951), and argemonine N-oxide was for the first time isolated from Argemone gracilenta in 1969 (Stermitz and McMurtrey 1969).
Mukerjee et al isolated a toxic substance from Argemone oil in 1941, with an empirical formula C20H15NO4 that was later identified as sanguinarine.
Argemone mexicana decoction for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria.
The GFDCA already has an on-the-spot food product detection kit, which can detect 21 types of adulteration, such as urea in milk, argemone in oil, traces of metals in food, aluminium in place of silver foils and others.
###Glass plates were spread with a thin layer of fat, upon which the milk of Peela Dhatoora (Argemone maxicana Linn.) is doused.