argentite


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Related to argentite: Acanthite

argentite

[′är·jən‚tīt]
(mineralogy)
Ag2S A lustrous, lead-gray ore of silver; it is a monoclinic mineral and is dimorphous with acanthite. Also known as argyrite; silver glance; vitreous silver.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the summer of 1908, the town council and the Coniagas Mining Company argued over ownership of the north end of Argentite Street.
The Argentite gold property is located in the Silver Peak Mining District, about 50 miles southwest of Tonopah.
Native silver and argentite, thought to be secondary in origin, were found in the Pleistocene ice that filled open spaces in the veins.
long before skiing, the high-grade ore was described as being solid argentite laced with wires of native silver.
He was drilling in rich ore, which was very difficult and time-consuming because of the soft and solid nature of the native silver and argentite.
The structure is a breccia with up to 20% sulfides (pyrite, silver bearing galena, argentite and sphalerite).
Originally Beutell had been experimenting with the synthesis of argentite and had noted the development of growths of pure silver on the synthetic sulfide he was producing.
Of course the collection also contains some top-quality specimens of more predictable German things (Freiberg silver and argentite and stephanite, Andreasberg pyrargyrite and calcite, Ems pyromorphite, Stassfurt anhydrite, Hagendorf phosphates, etc.
The Gloria and Abundancia veins consist of quartz veins, druzy quartz, and brecciated quartz in an altered, silicified volcanic unit with associated galena and argentite and occasional sphalerite.
Others (Behre, 1932, 1953; Butler and Singewald, 1940; Singewald and Butler, 1941) note that argentiferous tetrahedrite, argentite and other minerals may account for most of the silver in the primary galena-bearing ores.
As part of the middle stage mineralization in the northern periphery of the ore deposit, canfieldite, hocartite, stannite, hessite, argentite, pyrargyrite, stephanite, polybasite and native silver were deposited, characteristically accompanied by minor cassiterite, arsenopyrite and chlorite.
While certainly not the most dazzling case visually, this was probably the only place where one would ever get to see, say, a marcasite after argentite from Schemnitz, Hungary (now Banska Stiavnica, Slovakia); or a pyromorphite after galena from the German Schwarzwald; or an epidote after garnet from Arendal, Norway; or a couple of little green dodecahedrons of malachite after cuprite looking exactly like those from Chessy, France, but in fact from the Gumeshevsk mine, Urals, Russia (with a Chessy thumbnail next to them for mirror-image comparison).