aristocrat

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aristocrat

1. a member of the aristocracy; a noble
2. a person who advocates aristocracy as a form of government
References in periodicals archive ?
His adroit wordplay is well to the fore for instant rhyming acrobatical, mathematical, aristocratical, dramatical and fanatical in the poem 'Poetry in Motion'.
The Monarchic, Aristocratical, and Popular Partizans have been jointly laying their Axes to the Root of all Government, and have in their Turns proved each other absurd and inconvenient.
One writer called the move a "despotic scheme of government"; another said it was an attempt by "our aristocratical gentry" to silence the voice of the common citizen.
Of elvish society, Kirk says that "they have aristocratical rulers and laws, but no discernible religion, love or devotion towards God, the Blessed Maker of All" (13).
(quoting an eighteenth century pamphleteer: "Can the monarchical and aristocratical institutions of England, be consistent with ...
Post was decided, he was elected governor after running a campaign as a "humble farm boy," in which he declared, "[t]here's not a drop of aristocratical or oligarchial blood in my veins." (294)
The remains of aristocratical tyranny in the persons of the peers [the House of Lords].
If executive power, or any considerable part of it, is left in the hands of an aristocratical or democratical assembly, it will corrupt the legislature as necessarily as rust corrupts iron, or arsenic poisons the human body; and when the legislature is corrupted, the people are undone."
The absence of class differences is, we may recall, at the heart of Crevecoeur's Letters from an American Farmer, when he maps a space of equality in the new land: "Here are no aristocratical families, no courts, no kings, no bishops, no ecclesiastical dominion, no invisible power giving to a few a very visible one, no great manufacturers employing thousands, no great refinements of luxury.
For example, in a note, in a later edition, to what he referred as the almost unbelievable atrocities perpetrated by the democratical Corcyraeans upon their aristocratical brethern, Mitford glossed that his account "was written before the transactions in France had beggared all ideas formerly conceived, among the modern European nations, on such subjects." He asserted that a similar massacre had recently occurred at Lyons after its surrender to the republicans (3: 5-6).