armature

(redirected from armatures)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.

armature,

in art: see sculpturesculpture,
art of producing in three dimensions representations of natural or imagined forms. It includes sculpture in the round, which can be viewed from any direction, as well as incised relief, in which the lines are cut into a flat surface.
..... Click the link for more information.
.

Armature

 

a set of auxiliary, usually standard, mechanisms and components that are not basic parts of a machine, structure, or building but that ensure its proper functioning.

There are several types of armatures, including pipe fittings (for water, steam, gas, fuel, and various products processed in the chemical, food, and other industries). Depending on their function, pipe fittings are called shutoff fittings (faucets and slide valves); safety fittings (valves); control fittings (valves and pressure regulators); outlet fittings (air outlets and condensation outlets); emergency fittings (signal horns); and others.

The armatures used in electrical machine building are current-conducting and auxiliary parts securely attached to the rotor of an electrical machine. Armatures in electrical systems include panels, sockets, switches, plugs, and others. In electrical lines armatures are parts and devices for attaching insulators to supports (poles) and conductors to insulators. In lighting engineering, armatures are the parts of light fixtures designed to distribute the luminous flux, protect the eyes from bright light rays, deliver the electric current, reinforce the lamp, protect it from damage, and so forth. Furnace fittings (used in metallurgical furnaces) are metal parts that increase the strength of the furnace and cool its outer surfaces.

A. F. MOZHEIKO and G. IU. KARNAUKHOVA


Armature

 

the rotating part of an electric machine. The term “armature,” as opposed to “rotor,” is usually used for DC machines. An armature includes a magnetic core that consists of laminated sheets of electrical steel that are insulated from each other by varnish or paper. A winding is placed in slots on the core and is connected to the commutator bars.

armature

[′är·mə‚chər]
(architecture)
Framing or bars fashioned of structural ironwork and used to reinforce various features, for example, slender columns or hanging members.
(electromagnetism)
That part of an electric rotating machine that includes the main current-carrying winding in which the electromotive force produced by magnetic flux rotation is induced; it may be rotating or stationary.
The movable part of an electromagnetic device, such as the movable iron part of a relay, or the spring-mounted iron part of a vibrator or buzzer.

Armature

That part of an electric rotating machine which includes the main current-carrying winding. The armature winding is the winding in which the electromotive force (emf) produced by magnetic flux rotation is induced. In electric motors this emf is known as the counterelectromotive force.

On machines with commutators, the armature is normally the rotating member. On most ac machines, the armature is the stationary member and is called the stator. The core of the armature is generally constructed of steel or soft iron to provide a good magnetic path, and is usually laminated to reduce eddy currents. The armature windings are placed in slots on the surface of the core. On machines with commutators, the armature winding is connected to the commutator bars. On ac machines with stationary armatures, the armature winding is connected directly to the line. See Core loss, Windings in electric machinery

armature

1. The heavy-current winding of a motor or generator.
2. The winding in a solenoid or relay.
3. Structural ironwork in the form of framing or bars (commonly employed in medieval buildings) used to reinforce slender columns, or to consolidate canopies or hanging members such as bosses, and in tracery.

armature

1. a revolving structure in an electric motor or generator, wound with the coils that carry the current
2. any part of an electric machine or device that moves under the influence of a magnetic field or within which an electromotive force is induced
3. a soft iron or steel bar placed across the poles of a permanent magnet to close the magnetic circuit
4. such a bar placed across the poles of an electromagnet to transmit mechanical force
5. Sculpture a framework to support the clay or other material used in modelling
6. the protective outer covering of an animal or plant
References in periodicals archive ?
The electromagnetic modelling of such devices requires solving a time domain magnetodynamic problem, coupled to the electrical circuit equation of the inductor and the mechanical equation of the armature motion [6].
The newspaper acted as a simple armature to help the hollow structures retain volume.
Reed relays offer higher switching speeds than armature relays and have higher voltage and current handling capability than FETs.
The studies of Wheeler (1947; 1950) demonstrated that radioactive iodine (1131) was concentrated in the buccopharyngeal cells and armature of Drosophila gibberosa larva but no concentration of 1131 appeared in its endocrine structures.
The coefficient of expansion must be controlled so that it closely matches the copper and aluminum coefficients; otherwise the armature disc may warp or buckle as it is thermally cycled in the motor.
At launch, heat deposited in the armature and near the surface of the rails due to high currents and friction, or.
The clutch/brake allows use of the full range of control current supplied to regulate motion of brake and clutch armatures.
In this age of recycled containers, my fourth grade classes create armatures for papier-mache figures over jars and bottles with recognizable forms.
LO-COG[R] Series 8000 brush-commutated DC motors and gearmotors from Pittman feature seven-slot skewed armatures designed to minimize magnetic cogging (or reluctance torque) even at low speeds, which promotes their smooth and quiet operation.
As is well know, the reliefs, made between 1959 and 1966, are built on welded steel armatures that support wire-sewn patchworks of old and soot-stained canvas.
The Series 9000 motors and gear motors feature seven-slot skewed armatures to minimize magnetic cogging (or reluctance torque) even at low speeds, which promote their smooth and quiet operation.