Inhibitor

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inhibitor

[in′hib·əd·ər]
(aerospace engineering)
A substance bonded, taped, or dip-dried onto a solid propellant to restrict the burning surface and to give direction to the burning process.
(chemistry)
A substance which is capable of stopping or retarding a chemical reaction; to be technically useful, it must be effective in low concentration.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Inhibitor

 

a circuit having m + n inputs and a single output, at which a signal can appear only when there are no signals on the m inputs (inhibiting). The other n inputs (principal) form one of the two logic connections, “AND” or “OR.” Inhibitors are used extensively in computers. They are very often understood to be a circuit having a single principal input and a single inhibiting input. A signal appears at the output of such a circuit when a signal is present on the principal input but there is none on the inhibiting input. Such an inhibitor is called an anticoincidence gate; its conventional representation is given in Figure 1.

Figure 1. Block diagram of an anticoincidence gate (inhibitor) with m — 1 and n 1:(A) principal input, (Q) inhibiting input, (Ga) anticoincidence gate

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

inhibitor

A substance added to paint to retard drying, skinning, mildew growth, etc. Also see corrosion inhibitor, inhibiting pigment, drying inhibitor.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The answer is provided by Figure 3 (and partially by the top-ten Table 1) because here, the impact of individual chemicals on aromatase is only conditioned by internal dose and inhibition potency.
Aromatase is responsible for the physiologic balance of androgens and estrogens.
Aromatase is stimulated both by FSH action on granulosa cells and by thecal androgens, the substrates for aromatase (Daniel and Armstrong 1980; Hillier and De Zwart 1981).
He insisted that his team's work filled in at least one piece of the puzzle by suggesting that the conversion of testosterone in the brain to oestrogen by the enzyme aromatase is critical to developing and activating brain circuits that control male territorial behaviour.
This could have been caused by aromatase inhibition because the aromatase is expressed in the uterus (36), and inhibition would thus lead to a reduced intracrine estradiol synthesis that subsequently must be "subtracted" from the estrogenic response induced by the administered potent estrogens (31,32).
Given the recent evidence that plasma estradiol and estrone levels are increased in atrazine-treated male Wistar rats (33), it is apparent that the presence of ovarian aromatase is not essential for the effects of atrazine.
The two-factorial ANOVA showed that the activity of aromatase is significantly different between males and females, and it also is different between sections of different areas of the brain, showing an interaction between the effect of these two factors ([F.sub.0.05(1),1,68] = 10.91, p = 0.001; [F.sub.0.05(1),16,68] = 10.4, p = 1.17 x [10.sup.-12]; and [F.sub.0.05(1),16,68] = 4.15, p = 1.74 x [10.sup.-5], respectively).