Harquebus

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Harquebus

 

one of the original models of Western European hand firearms, which appeared in the first third of the 15th century. The harquebus was loaded from the muzzle, and the powder charge was ignited by hand through a cartridge vent on the barrel. Stone, and later lead, spherical bullets were fired from the harquebus. In Rus’ the harquebus was called a pishchal’.


Harquebus

 

(Russian, pishchal’), a heavy hand firearm and artillery gun, with which Russian troops were armed from the 15th to 17th centuries.

At first the harquebus was used for the defense of fortresses. Later, it also came to be used in field battle. The hand-held harquebus had one or more barrels and was called a short, or shoulder, harquebus. Certain types of harquebuses were used to blast walls during sieges, and others were designed to defend fortresses. In Rus’, regimental types of harquebuses were called sokoliki and volkoneiki. The caliber of artillery harquebuses ranged from 1.2 to 10 inches, and their length was 10–70 calibers. Certain harquebuses were up to 110 calibers in length. Various models of the harquebus are preserved in the Central Museum of the Artillery, Engineer Troops, and Signal Troops in Leningrad.

References in periodicals archive ?
The evolution of pishchal' from small-caliber cannons into shoulder arms paralleled that of the West European arquebus and Ottoman tufek.
armour that was virtually arrow-proof, whereas an arquebus slug
Warren conducts a journey through military history in "After Teacups," including a battle "Bogged in the marshes, clubbing my arquebus" (4, l.
Nor does he even mention the military reality that by the middle of the sixteenth century any serious discussion as to the length of stirrup of an individual horseman was being rendered irrelevant by the lethal efficacy of opposing artillery, spearheaded by the musket and arquebus. By mid-century few horsemen, however well prepared, survived a fusillade of hostile gunshot in open warfare.
In other villages, "the roughneck soldiers raped the women and cut their breasts" (Miquel 1980,129-32); a 17-year old young man was tied to the trunk of an olive tree and riddled with arquebus (an axe/sword weapon) blows.
When I saw them make a move to draw their bows upon us, I took aim with my arquebus and shot straight at one of the chiefs, and with this shot two fell to the ground and one of their companions was wounded who died thereof a little later..."
Capitano Sigismondo Tolomei Left his horse to Capitano Catanio Tolomei and his armour and arquebus to Asdrubale Sermini.
It was called a harquebus (or arquebus) from a Dutch word meaning "hook-gun." Perhaps it got this name because the early harquebuses were used in association with pikes, pikes being "hook-spears."
Arquebus Solutions is based on the Coventry University Technology Park and works with a range of organisations across the globe in identifying the guns used in criminal activity.
Another is Japan's Warring-States Period, from 1467 to the late 16th century, when Japan perfected the arquebus musket and developed precocious infantry tactics and formations that were then exported to Korea in Hideyoshi's invasion of 1592-8.
Initially "musket" was a larger form of arquebus that required a stand, but soon "musket" was used as a generic term for both.