art glass


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art glass

A type of decorative leaded glass window in which scenes or patterns are produced by using colored rather than stained glass; it is common in works of the Art Nouveau style. Also works of blown glass.
See also: Glass
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

art glass

A type of colored glass used in windows during the late 19th and early 20th centuries; characterized by unusual combinations of hues and special effects in transparency and opaqueness.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption(s): Ariel of France has expanded its line of art glass lamps that features vibrant colors and patterns, night light bases and hand-painted shades.
A graduate of Marietta College in Ohio, Fenton, with his brother Bill, assumed leadership positions at Fenton Art Glass when their father and uncle died in 1948.
To that end, Fenton Art Glass began its association with the ALS Association (ALSA) early last year when it created a limited-edition basket, with proceeds of its sales going to ALSA.
In much the same way, Fenton Art Glass's glass hats were the result of the success of a previous introduction.
Despite the weak economy, the art glass industry is alive and thriving.
Desna art glass molds were introduced in the 1920s, around the same time that Rene Lalique began producing his collection of art glass molds.
Exploring Scale in Art Glass Sculpture" from 2 to 7 p.m.
From simple tableware and drinking glasses, they started to produce decorative art glass pieces.
Small but robust, the art glass category is garnering attention from an increasing number of designers who focus on handcrafted pieces, and from consumers who better appreciate and understand the business.
Sarasota--Glass Now, a Contemporary Art Glass Weekend
Peter Layton is an English glass artist who started one of the first hot-glass studios in Europe, and today London Glassblowing is the premier studio where Peter and other fine art glass artists create their work.