work of art

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work of art

1. a piece of fine art, such as a painting or sculpture
2. something that may be likened to a piece of fine art, esp in beauty, intricacy, etc.
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
She noted that artists have used a range of natural materials for the art objects - some from plants, minerals and different types of rocks such as malachite as well as various types of metals, including gold and silver.
Decorative art objects should not be considered to be purely status symbols or embodiments of cultural meaning, as many postmodernists claim they are.
And so are art objects, insofar as no art object is a natural object.
Although the original Minimalist artists never created a singular movement or school with a manifesto, their work shared a basic premise: an art object should make no reference to anything outside of itself.
The focus of the contributors is not solely or fundamentally on the art object but on the social groups and cultural practices contributory to the making and celebrating of the object.
While Bramberger would simplify the square with his grid of paving, replacing the accumulated detritus of curbs, broken surfaces and street furniture with a tempting tabula rasa, Zinganel proposed that the money for the art object be put into a bank.
In this fascinating readable publication, the author explores the book as both content and as art object. Believing that the concept of book art elevates words and images to heightened levels of communication and expression, this book covers both philosophical and pragmatic aspects of book art.
Any thought of ennobling it as an art object would have been thought of as bad taste for a young democracy taking great pains to learn new ways.
Friedman's empty fetishes, though, are juxtaposed with his 1992-97 piece 1,000 Hours of Staring, a square piece of white paper whose status as an art object rests with the artist's claim that he stared at the thing off and on for a thousand hours.
One cannot verbalize the emotions of a pictorial Europa with dramatic clarity if one is at the same time declaring that she is a marvel of foreshortening or of bas-relief technique or of rococo realism - that is, if one is being distanced from the picture by a reminder of her status as art object. This may be why the most favored verbal formula of all in the descriptions of images is that they are so real.
As the art object was disappearing, Fischer introduced a new set of commercial practices, which included flying in the artists instead of the art.