catheter

(redirected from arterial catheter)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to arterial catheter: arterial line

catheter

Med a long slender flexible tube for inserting into a natural bodily cavity or passage for introducing or withdrawing fluid, such as urine or blood
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

catheter

[′kath·ə·dər]
(medicine)
A hollow, tubular device for insertion into a cavity, duct, or vessel to permit injection or withdrawal of fluids or to establish patency of the passageway.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arterial catheters are widely used in ICUs for monitoring blood pressure and for arterial blood sampling.
Clinical review: complications and risk factors of peripheral arterial catheters used for haemodynamic monitoring in anaesthesia and intensive care medicine.
We observed that despite aspiration of free blood from the radial arterial catheters the trace was damped and the trace gradually improved over the next 2 hours.
After cleaning and draping, Rt IJV was located through 22G cannula,guide wire was put in, followed by sliding the 22Gx8cm vygon arterial catheter over the guide wire into the right atrium.Whole length of the catheter was inserted and point of insertion was adjusted to avoid coiling in the right atrium.
Our review of the literature within the fields of critical care medicine, nursing, and physical therapy has yet to find published reports of adverse outcomes related to mobility of patients with femoral arterial catheters in the ICU.
You immediately remove the radial arterial catheter and begin vasodilatory treatments including warming of the contralateral upper limb, application of 2% nitroglycerin ointment and axillary brachial plexus sympathetic nerve block.
The indices ranged in level of difficulty to performfrom automatic (PVI, noninvasively obtained via the Masimo Radical-7 Pulse CO-Oximeter) to invasive (DeltaPP, respiratory variations in arterial pulse pressure obtained via arterial catheter) to operator-dependent (CO, cardiac output obtained via echocardiography).
The gold-standard sample for blood-gas analysis is arterial blood obtained anaerobically via an indwelling arterial catheter (most often sited at the radial artery in adults and the umbilical artery in neonates), or arterial puncture.
Kuvaki B, Tuncali B, Capar E 2005 A comparison of the efficacy of heparinised and non-heparinised solutions for maintenance of perioperative radial arterial catheter patency and subsequent ccclusion Anesthesia & Analgesia 100 (4) 1117-1121
The benefit of heparin in peripheral and arterial catheters was studied before the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN) Thunder I Project.
Several studies have been conducted covering issues such as comfort, accuracy an arterial catheter, and effective use in the morbidly obese population with positive results.