arterial

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arterial

1. of, relating to, or affecting an artery or arteries
2. denoting or relating to the usually bright red reoxygenated blood returning from the lungs or gills that circulates in the arteries
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Arterial inflammation leads to stenotic or occlusive arterial lesions, predisposing to symptomatic end-organ ischemia.
Pumpkin seeds, cashews and walnuts keep blood pressure in check with stabilizing magnesium and good fats to limit arterial inflammation. Lastly, dark chocolate: Choose 70 percent cocoa or bittersweet chocolate and indulge in a half-ounce twice a day two to three times a week with berries, which contain health-boosting antioxidants.
It has been detected in human atheroma and has lead to the concept that it could be the link between Cp, arterial inflammation, and atherosclerosis.23 Pesonen et al found that infection by Cp was associated with coronary obstruction.24
"The HIV-infected patients, essentially with total virological suppression and very low Framingham Risk Scores - a group that you would ordinarily not be particularly concerned about - had very significant arterial inflammation compared with the Framingham Risk Score matched controls," he commented.
Atherosclerosis has long been recognized as a disease characterized by chronic arterial inflammation. More-recent studies have indicated that this inflammation is driven by adaptive immune responses against modified self antigens (such as oxidized LDL) that have been trapped in the artery wall.
There are 3 important factors that predispose patients to plaque rupture or recurrent events: plaque burden or multiple arterial plaques, the presence of persistent hyperreactive platelets, and ongoing vascular arterial inflammation. Successful therapeutic strategies focus on these predisposing factors, and the use of low-density lipoprotein-lowering medications (principally statins) and antiplatelet agents (principally aspirin) has had a major impact on the occurrence of cardiovascular outcomes and overall mortality over the last 2 decades.
You should monitor your blood pressure regularly, eat a low-fat, low-sodium diet, and get at least 30 minutes of moderately intense exercise daily to reduce arterial inflammation and plaque buildup.
The uptake of iron by periadventitial fat macrophages suggests a potential means of imaging areas of arterial inflammation. This periadventitial uptake should improve the spatial resolution of magnetic resonance imaging--the greatest drawback of that technology--and thus allow a major advance in the noninvasive imaging of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques.