atheroma

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atheroma

[‚ath·ə′rōm·ə]
(medicine)
A lipid deposit in the inner wall of an artery; characteristic of atherosclerosis.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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How might this be for nanotechnology; how many nanobots at a time should be introduced; how might they be retrieved later; and could they become a problem if allowed to navigate inside existing arterial plaques? These are not small concerns.
Multivariable Regression Models Predicting Mixed Coronary Arterial Plaques. Both hsTns were adjusted within multivariable logistic regression models to predict the presence of patients with mixed coronary plaques.
This is because it's not altogether clear that excess calcium is deposited in the arteries, though the conclusion seems logical enough because the bones have limited ability to absorb calcium given in larger doses than those found in foods, and because we do see evidence of calcium building up in arteries and in arterial plaques. This, however, is widely understood in the medical community to occur in response to injury, and can be thought of as an effort to wall off an area of the artery that has been damaged--by cholesterol or smoking, for example.
Biotech company AtheroNova Inc (AHRO) reported on Thursday the receipt of a Notice of Issuance for its patent application 8,304,383 for the Dissolution of Arterial Plaque using hyodeoxycholic acid.
When consumed by humans in large quantities, phytosterols reduce arterial plaque buildup.
Recent histologic investigations have demonstrated that CRP is present in the human arterial intima of atherosclerotic lesions (3) and is located in macrophages of the arterial plaque. In addition, macrophages have been shown to produce CRP mRNA(4).
Excessive arterial plaque levels can restrict blood flow and increase the risk of blood clots--and therefore stroke or myocardial infarction (heart attack).
Novel imaging technologies have allowed the visualization of early changes in arterial plaque and arterial wan thickness in asymptomatic patients with early-stage atherosclerosis, thus advancing our understanding of the natural course and underlying pathophysiology of atherosclerosis.
Am I the arterial plaque that others have to bypass in order to achieve career health?"
This CT angiogram showed I had 00.00 arterial plaque? Nothing.
"These children do not have hard, calcified arterial plaque as we see in older people, and hopefully we can document some regression with changes in lifestyle [and] behaviors, and if need be, drug therapy." Currently, children at her clinic who are identified as having advanced vascular age receive nutrition and exercise counseling.