graft

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graft,

in surgery: see transplantation, medicaltransplantation, medical,
surgical procedure by which a tissue or organ is removed and replaced by a corresponding part, usually from another part of the body or from another individual.
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graft

[graft]
(biology)
To unite to form a graft.
A piece of tissue transplanted from one individual to another or to a different place on the same individual.
An individual resulting from the grafting of parts.
(botany)
To unite a scion to an understock in such manner that the two grow together and continue development as a single plant without change in scion or stock.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

graft

To join a scion, shoot, or bud to the stock of another similar plant.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

graft

1. Horticulture
a. a piece of plant tissue (the scion), normally a stem, that is made to unite with an established plant (the stock), which supports and nourishes it
b. the plant resulting from the union of scion and stock
c. the point of union between the scion and the stock
2. Surgery a piece of tissue or an organ transplanted from a donor or from the patient's own body to an area of the body in need of the tissue
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Reduction in arteriovenous graft impairment: results of a vascular access surveillance protocol.
Comparison of access blood flow and venous pressure measurements as predictors of arteriovenous graft thrombosis.
Our study provided morphological and molecular evidence that the CES is effective in mitigating IH and improving the molding of vein grafts in a rabbit arteriovenous graft model.
At our centre, arteriovenous grafts are cannulated a minimum of three weeks after insertion.
The same principle must apply to arteriovenous grafts. Although the Canadian and American guidelines (Churchill et al., 1999; NKF, 2002) recommend a minimum of 14 days, the amount of swelling and bruising can vary from patient to patient.
Vascular access stenosis is a frequent problem in patients on hemodialysis that affects the patency of arteriovenous fistulas (AVFs) and arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) (Pirozzi, Garcia-Medina, & Hanoy, 2014).
Management of infected prosthetic dialysis arteriovenous grafts. Journal of Vascular Surgery, 39(1), 73-78.
Construction of prosthetic arteriovenous grafts for hemodialysis.
The concerns about whether surgeons or nephrologists determine when an access can be used suggests the possible need for recommendations for further education in the assessment of new arteriovenous grafts or arteriovenous fistulae by dialysis staff.
There is much evidence that native AVFs, compared to arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) or catheter-based hemodialysis accesses, provide longer patency rates, require fewer interventions, have less infections and ischemic complications, and subsequently lower mortality rates for the patient.
For example, a recent meta-analysis asked whether surgical thrombectomy was the most effective treatment for thrombosed prosthetic arteriovenous grafts (Green, Lee, & Kucey, 2002).