airway

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airway

1. an air route, esp one that is fully equipped with emergency landing fields, navigational aids, etc.
2. a passage down which air travels from the nose or mouth to the lungs
3. Med a tubelike device inserted via the throat to keep open the airway of an unconscious patient
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Airway

 

an approved route for regular flights of transport planes. The route is provided with maintained airfields and with the necessary ground-support equipment (radio beacons, air lane identification markers, and the like) to insure safe takeoff and landing. Civil aviation flights are generally carried out on airways. In some special cases—for instance, when servicing expeditions or rendering emergency medical assistance—flights are carried out independent of any airway. The first Soviet airway was inaugurated in 1923 between Moscow and Nizhnii Novgorod (now called Gorky). In 1968 more than 2,500 airways (with a total extent of about 500,000 km) constituted the consolidated network of the USSR Aeroflot system, linking about 3,500 cities and populated points within the country and 44 foreign countries.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

airway

[′er‚wā]
(building construction)
A passage for ventilation between thermal insulation and roof boards.
(mining engineering)
A passage for air in a mine. Also known as air course.
(navigation)
A designated route of passage for aircraft.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

airway

airway
A passage for ventilation between thermal insulation and roof boards.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

airway

airwayclick for a larger image
Some of the legends on airways for aeronautical charts.
A control area, or a portion thereof, established in the form of a corridor (ICAO). An airway is equipped with radio navigation aids. It is a path through navigable airspace designated by the appropriate authority within which air traffic services are provided.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinical practice standards for endotracheal tube removal include attentive post extubation monitoring, prompt identification of respiratory distress, maintenance of a patent airway and, if clinically indicated, attempts to successfully establish an artificial airway by reintubation or in rare situations, surgical technique (AARC 2007) .
The use of an oral artificial airway instead of the nasal type is recommended because nasal intubations increases the risk of developing nosocomial sinusitis thus will further increasing the development of VAP (Pruitt & Jacobs, 2006).
(15) Therefore, physical therapists working with mechanically ventilated patients must have a thorough knowledge of mechanical ventilation and artificial airways. A comprehensive orientation program and competency assessment is the key for a successful physical therapy practice in the critical care environment.
He was treated at pitchside and then rushed to hospital where an emergency tracheotomy was performed --a hole was cut in his throat and an artificial airway inserted --because of concern about the swelling in his throat.
The endotracheal (ET) tube is a transparent plastic device that provides an artificial airway during the delivery of anesthesia.
When individuals are unable to clear secretions or obstructions from the respiratory tract sufficiently to maintain open airways, tracheostomy (insertion of an artificial airway) is required.
Until recently, options for mechanical ventilation for children with chronic respiratory problems included negative pressure ventilation or positive pressure ventilation through an artificial airway (Padman, Lawless, & Von Nesson, 1994) (see Figure 1).
Oh yes: make certain you are dealing with the inflammation of anaphylaxis, and not an airway obstruction since the artificial airway will complicate everything.
The placement of an artificial airway and controlled ventilation to calculate true inspiration and expiration measurements will not only affect the native airway dimensions, but it 'will also require a higher sedation dose, prolonging the recovery.
The final intervention, should a 'can't intubate, can't ventilate' situation develop, is the introduction of an artificial airway. In the emergency situation, what is often referred as an emergency tracheotomy, is in fact a chricothyroidotomy.
Thompson L (2000) Suctioning adults with an artificial airway. Joanna Briggs Institute for Evidence Based Nursing and Midwifery, Systematic Review No.