artificial sweetener


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sweetener, artificial,

substance used as a low-calorie sugar substitute. Saccharinsaccharin
, C7H5NSO3, white, crystalline, aromatic compound. It was discovered accidentally by I. Remsen and C. Fahlberg in 1879. Pure saccharin tastes several hundred times as sweet as sugar.
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, cyclamatescyclamate
, any member of a group of salts of cyclamic acid (cyclohexanesulfamic acid). The sodium and calcium salts were commonly used as artificial sweeteners until 1969, when their use was banned by the U.S.
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, and aspartame have been the most commonly used artificial sweeteners. Saccharin, a coal-tar derivative three hundred times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1879. Cyclamates were approved for consumer use in 1951; they are 30 times sweet as sugar and, unlike saccharin. have no bitter aftertaste at high concentration. They were banned in 1969 because of suspected carcinogenic properties. Aspartame, an amino-acid compound that is about 160 times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1965 and is a widely used low-calorie sweetener. It cannot be used in cooking because it is destroyed on boiling in water. People who are sensitive to the amino acid phenylalanine should not use aspartame. Neotame, an aspartame analog, is 30 to 60 times sweeter than aspartame, more stable at high temperatures, and far less likely to pose a risk to people sensitive to phenylalanine. Sucralose, which is manufactured by adding chlorine to sugar, is not destroyed by heat and is widely used as a sweetener in packaged foods that have been baked or otherwise heated during their processing. About 600 times sweeter than sugar, it was first synthesized in 1976. Stevioside, which is 300 times as sweet as sucrose, is a terpene derivative and is available in several countries.

artificial sweetener:

see sweetener, artificialsweetener, artificial,
substance used as a low-calorie sugar substitute. Saccharin, cyclamates, and aspartame have been the most commonly used artificial sweeteners. Saccharin, a coal-tar derivative three hundred times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1879.
..... Click the link for more information.
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artificial sweetener

[¦ärd·ə¦fish·əl ′swēt·nər]
(food engineering)
A sugar substitute, such as saccharin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Scientists found that people who consumed lots of artificial sweeteners for two weeks - the equivalent to drinking five cans of diet drink a day - lost their ability to control glucose absorption.
Consumption of artificial sweeteners, such as aspartame, sucralose and stevia, is widespread and increasing.
Competitive landscape of the artificial sweetener market in the UK
A number of studies support the fact that artificial sweetener cause an increase in insulin release11,12.
They checked those results against 125 controls who were referred for Hashimoto's work-up but turned out to be antibody negative; 15 (12%) regularly used artificial sweeteners, 110 (88%) did not.
Artificial sweeteners or intense sweeteners are sugar substitutes that are used as an alternative to table sugar.
At this time, however, the National Cancer Institute says there's no clear scientific evidence that any artificial sweeteners approved in the U.
Furthermore, many artificial sweeteners are derived from completely natural sources, while what we think of as all-natural often isn't quite: table sugar is of course heavily refined, but so are many "natural" sweeteners--even agave nectar.
Artificial sweeteners are abundant in food and drinks, and often added to drugs and sanitary products as well.
In both trials, the cyclists swilling their mouths with the carbohydrate drink performed significantly better than those given the artificial sweetener drink.
A new artificial sweetener came on the market, with lots of hype, called "Splenda".
That's why millions of people drink diet sodas and eat foods that contain artificial sweeteners in place of sugar.