artificial ventilation


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artificial ventilation

[¦ärd·ə¦fish·əl ‚vent·əl′ā·shən]
(mining engineering)
The inducing of a flow of air through a mine or part of a mine by mechanical or other means.
References in periodicals archive ?
Artificial ventilation and anesthesia are needed in critical care and trauma scenarios, and also required during invasive medical procedures.
When an infant has trouble breathing, she needs to be assisted by artificial ventilation and oxygen.
A severe disease course was defined as presence of necrosis by contrast-enhanced CT (a Balthazar score of 5 or more points), while a nonsevere, "harmless" course was defined as having no necrosis (a Balthazar score of 0-4), no need for artificial ventilation or dialysis at any time during the hospital stay, and no fatal outcome.
Most of the patients here are in critical condition and are on artificial ventilation.
Assessors are likely to look at factors such as the thermal characteristics of the building, heating and hot water systems, air conditioning, artificial ventilation and built-in lighting installations.
The author presents the historical, legal and medical background of this "new death" as a consequence of the medical technology of artificial ventilation, but brain death was primarily a medical-legal construct to facilitate organ transplantation, which requires that vital organs be perfused in a living body just before harvesting.
The child's mother obtained a temporary injunction forcing the hospital to continue artificial ventilation so that she would have more time to arrange transfer, but after five months, a probate judge ruled that another health care provider would not be found, and life support was withdrawn.
Besides serving as a nurse case manager for a hospice in Northern Nevada, she provides consultation and information for individuals and groups on such topics as hydration, resuscitation, artificial ventilation, and other unexpected issues that arise as a result of illness and decline.
The legal fight has centred on whether she should be given artificial ventilation if her condition worsened.
The legal fight has centred around whether she should be given artificial ventilation if her condition worsened.
Parents Debbie and Darren Wyatt won a High Court ruling last month which lifted an earlier decision that doctors need not give Charlotte artificial ventilation to keep her alive.
Mrs Wyatt, 24, who is heavily pregnant with the couple's fourth child, and her husband Darren, 33, had asked the judge to lift his order as they said the condition of their daughter has improved to such an extent that she has now "crossed an invisible line", meaning that the use of artificial ventilation would be justified.