ascribed status


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ascribed status

any social position to which a person is allocated by birth or directly as the outcome of family background, and which cannot readily be altered by their own ACHIEVEMENT. As such, ascribed status contrasts with ACHIEVED STATUS. See also PATTERN VARIABLES.
References in periodicals archive ?
Generally speaking, ascribed status seems to matter more.
"Ascribed status" is defined clearly enough; "achieved status," however, is defined in a passive way that makes it hard to distinguish from "ascribed status" for the uninitiated: pertaining "to a person's position in life" and "generally dictated by that individual's society" (pp.
Blau and Duncan's (1967) foundational model explains that status attainment is affected, both directly and indirectly, by ascribed status and achieved status.
In chapter 7, Lemons raises the issue of "privilege" for the heterosexual black male with their sexual orientation functioning as their most significant ascribed status that provides them with substantial social advantage.
We are products of our environment and our ascribed status, the family, the time, the place, the society, the culture, the socialization, indoctrination, brainwashing, and education we're born into.
In form, Bono has moved far beyond any stereotyped notion of the role performed by a celebrity diplomat with ascribed status. Although he started out as the "famous face" of the Jubilee 2000 campaign, (11) Bono has become the hub of a sophisticated network that bridges the worlds of entertainment and business.
Considerable research links accents and dialects with ascribed status ratings.
(25) Paul again uses the mechanism of disidentification to decast Onesimus from his former ascribed status and presents him to the addressees in an elevated status (re-identification).
Add to that a rather large superstructure of ascribed status and security, and we have a system that is set up for collapse.
Finally, Terry Martin's "Modernization or Neo-Traditionalism?" returns us full circle to the issue of ascribed status. The Soviets, in attempting to move people from local nationalism to the "higher stage" of a new, supranational Soviet culture, instead inadvertently promoted (through forced labeling) the idea that national identities were inherent and "primordial."
Ascribed status may be enhanced through matching the race or ethnicity of the client and counselor.