asexual

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asexual

1. having no apparent sex or sex organs
2. (of reproduction) not involving the fusion of male and female gametes, as in vegetative reproduction, fission, or budding

asexual

[ā′seksh·ə·wəl]
(biology)
Not involving sex.
Exhibiting absence of sex or of functional sex organs.
References in periodicals archive ?
He added that by combining the BBM1 expression method with this MiMe method, the authors showed that in some cases they could skip normal sexual reproduction and instead reproduce rice asexually. This results in the production of seeds is ultimately a clone of the parent plant.
Tetrathyridia that we observed with a dissecting microscope were asexually proliferative by means of multiple and binary fission.
A gray smudge on a sunflower seed head might just be the asexually reproducing counterpart of a tiny satellite dish-shaped thing.
The ability to reproduce asexually was then established in Holothuria hilla [38, 54].
How doesn't it reproduce?" said Nelson, explaining that the algae can reproduce sexually or asexually -- making spores and even fragmenting and regenerating itself.
Plant Patent: issued for a new invention or discovery of an asexually reproduced, distinct and new variety of plant.
The study, first funded in 2011 and continuing until 2015, will study the New Zealand snails to see if it is better that they reproduce sexually or asexually -the snail can do both -hoping to gain insight on why so many organisms practice sexual reproduction.
Myriad factors remain unexplored in this species, including the ploidy of sexually and asexually produced eggs, the effects of parasites or other considerations of co-evolution (e.g., the Red Queen Hypothesis), and the accumulation of deleterious mutations (e.g., Muller's Ratchet).
Targeting this foundation species is the invasive pest hemlock woolly adelgid, which reproduces asexually and literally sucks the life out of trees.
Because many hawthorn species produce seeds asexually, yet are also capable of hybridizing, their hybrids are often common and locally abundant.
Perhaps, like the yeast in the ale they love, they've learnt to reproduce asexually by depositing spores in warm corners of badly-ventilated pubs?
This is because bacteria reproduce asexually, and each isolate will not exhibit a unique type of fingerprint.