ash flow


Also found in: Wikipedia.

ash flow

[′ash ‚flō]
(geology)
An avalanche of volcanic ash, generally a highly heated mixture of volcanic gases and ash, traveling down the flanks of a volcano or along the surface of the ground. Also known as glowing avalanche; incandescent tuff flow.
A deposit of volcanic ash and other debris resulting from such a flow and lying on the surface of the ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tenders Are Invited For Providing Civil Foundation For Ash Flow Stability Study In Esp Hopper Test Rig
Smaller clinkers and ash flow out of the boiler easily (Figure 1).
The ash flow surge is eight to 12 times the boiling point.
The latest round of eruption prompted authorities to order the relocation of villages in areas where the ash flow could damage crops, pollute water sources and endanger the lives of residents.
Characterised by warm and vibrant colours and evidence of intense ash flow within the kiln, Johnston's work ranges from large jars that feel as if they have just been unearthed to artisan sushi platters that feel right at home in the 21st century.
The Government said it was continuing to monitor the ash flow.
The vibration feeders are motor operated and equipped with frequency controller to adjust the bottom ash flow required for dense slurry mixing and discharge.
The Oligocene to early Miocene-age rhyolitic ash flow tuffs which host the gold ore apparently originated from a number of eruptive centers in the Toquima and Toiyabe Ranges (Boden, 1986).
However, the succession of volcaniclastic strata as published by these authors is not easily recognised in the field and the present writers distinguish a larger number of eruptions as represented by several pyroclastic intervals and ash fall deposits, followed by ash flow beds in the higher part.
Paipa volcano products are mainly pyroclastic pumice and ash flow tuffs, lava domes and pyroclastic block and ash flow tuffs.
Focus your conversation on how the numbers affect the bottom line (profit) and/or ash flow when presenting to management.
Lithium-enriched Tertiary-era Fish Lake formation Rhyolitic tuffs or ash flow tuffs have accumulated in this valley or basinal environment, and over time interstitial formational waters in contact with these tuffs, have become enriched in lithium, and could possibly be amenable to extraction by evaporative methods, much as Chemetall Foote currently produces Lithium on their Clayton Valley Property which is only some 19 miles to the SE of Fish Lake.