ashen light


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ashen light

1. The faint glow claimed to be occasionally observed on the unlit area of Venus in its crescent phase. Its cause is unknown but it might result from bombardment of atmospheric atoms and molecules by energetic particles and radiation, as with terrestrial airglow.
2. See earthshine.

ashen light

[′ash·ən ¦līt]
(astronomy)
A faint, luminous glow sometimes observed over the right side of Venus when it is close to inferior conjunction, probably due to electrical disturbances in the ionosphere of Venus.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Close by in the ashen light lay her face, so pallid as to seem bleached.
The den of the celestial lions, Leo and Leo Minor, is adorned with the ashen light of myriad far-flung galaxies awaiting our admiration.
Scientists have previously reported that the night side Venus atmosphere also produces a glow, called the ashen light. Some have suggested that lightning on Venus is responsible, although that explanation is not universally accepted.
The Ashen Light was again reported by a rather small number of visual observers, and these records will be dealt with in a later report.
The residual hush of interiors resplendent in mahogany and metal, the crumbling statuary on soot-streaked pediments, the soaring flights of marble columns are all softly dusted with this ashen light which translates, to the history-minded viewer's eye, as the physical counterpart of time.
As the ghostly ashen light of dawn filtered into the eastern sky, Dennis spotted a lonely out-of-place boy as young as himself.
Royal Match (Ryan Jarvis) is too good for Amboise (Henry Cecil/Alan Bond) in the mile-and-a-half handicap and Breast Stroke (Jeremy Hindley) takes the nursery from Ashen Light (Anthony Johnson/George Duffield).
(As the planet nears our line of sight with the sun we see more of its night side.) For more information on the chances of seeing Venus before sunrise and after sunset on the same day or of viewing the ashen light on the planet's night side, see the March issue of Sky & Telescope magazine, also available on the Web at www.skypub.com.
As early as 1600, Galileo had begun to transfer his artist's knowledge of reflection and secondary light to his study of the moon and its mysterious ashen light. He was, perhaps, among the first to realize that it was reflected light from the earth - the light of the sun to the earth reflected back to the moon.
Some earthbound astronomers have mentioned a pale "ashen light" on the planet's night side, for example, but any connection at this point, notes UCLA's Luhmann, is "anybody's guess." Would a human explorer standing on the surface of -- or flying past -- Venus be able to see anything of one of the solar system's most unusual light shows?
This "ashen light," as it became known, resembles the faint Earthshine seen on the darkened portion of a nearly new Moon (S&T: July 2014, p.
On April 24 I received an email from Detlev Niechoy (Germany) who strongly suspected the Ashen Light (AL) late that evening, from 21:00-21:50h UT.