trouble

(redirected from asking for trouble)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Idioms.

trouble

a. political unrest or public disturbances
b. the Troubles political violence in Ireland during the 1920s or in Northern Ireland since the late 1960s
References in periodicals archive ?
Sell to an unsophisticated buyer with limited net worth and you're asking for trouble. He or she might be able to rescind the transaction on legal grounds because there are rules about who qualifies for buying stock or other equity interests, particularly in a closely held business.
These skirts are extremely heavy, so opening both skins on the same hinge point is asking For trouble. If the hinge breaks, someone could be seriously injured or killed by the Falling skirts.
"You couldn't even walk around in a wig, or you'd be asking for trouble. So much has changed since then."
"The new cowboys at the Pentagon were dearly asking for trouble," he writes.
If the tenant allows the contractor to amass unsigned change orders, then to present them in a pile after the work has been done, he is asking for trouble. Tenants have the least power to negotiate at that point.
Churches that hand out partisan literature are asking for trouble from the IRS."
"We were 2-0 down and to still play five across the middle was asking for trouble.
Normally, if you stick a supercomputer in a dusty, 85[degrees] room, you are asking for trouble. But that is exactly where Green Destiny has been for the past year.
Having pushed through a reform of the pension system this year, and with unions still licking their wounds, launching showbiz reforms on the eve of France's summer fest season was asking for trouble.
Launching a new car is never easy, but launching a new car and a new division and dealer body is asking for trouble. Ford got it--in spades.
What the pair see at Joe's house, besides some overdone (but maybe not) depictions of the American method of poor plant supervision, is chaos, command-and-control, needless complexity (including the effort in compiling data reports) and a lesson why "pushing" work material and orders into production is asking for trouble. In this entertaining, easy-to-read manner, the plot presents the philosophical and mindset changes that a foundry must clear to seriously consider lean manufacturing.
According to American Running Editorial Board Member Marvin Bloom, M.D., running on injured knees (such as a tom meniscus or a loss of articular cartilage) is like running a car engine without motor oil--you're asking for trouble. If your knees hurt and you don't fully recover with a day of rest, see a sports medicine professional and find out why it is hurting and what you can do about it (Annals of Rheumatic Diseases, 2001, Vol.