aspartame


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Related to aspartame: Acesulfame potassium

sweetener, artificial

sweetener, artificial, substance used as a low-calorie sugar substitute. Saccharin, cyclamates, and aspartame have been the most commonly used artificial sweeteners. Saccharin, a coal-tar derivative three hundred times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1879. Cyclamates were approved for consumer use in 1951; they are 30 times sweet as sugar and, unlike saccharin. have no bitter aftertaste at high concentration. They were banned in 1969 because of suspected carcinogenic properties. Aspartame, an amino-acid compound that is about 160 times as sweet as sugar, was discovered in 1965 and is a widely used low-calorie sweetener. It cannot be used in cooking because it is destroyed on boiling in water. People who are sensitive to the amino acid phenylalanine should not use aspartame. Neotame, an aspartame analog, is 30 to 60 times sweeter than aspartame, more stable at high temperatures, and far less likely to pose a risk to people sensitive to phenylalanine. Sucralose, which is manufactured by adding chlorine to sugar, is not destroyed by heat and is widely used as a sweetener in packaged foods that have been baked or otherwise heated during their processing. About 600 times sweeter than sugar, it was first synthesized in 1976. Stevioside, which is 300 times as sweet as sucrose, is a terpene derivative and is available in several countries.
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aspartame

[a′spär‚tām]
(organic chemistry)
C14H18N2O5 A dipeptide ester about 160 times sweeter than sucrose in aqueous solution; used as a low-calorie sweetener.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

aspartame

an artificial sweetener produced from aspartic acid. Formula: C14H18N2O5
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
He said: "Our analysis of the evidence shows that, if the benchmarks the panel used to evaluate the results of reassuring studies had been consistently used to evaluate the results of studies that provided evidence that aspartame maybe unsafe then they would have been obliged to conclude there was sufficient evidence to indicate aspartame is not acceptably safe.
Stevia is the safest, because aspartame, sucralose, and (rarely used) saccharin cause cancer in animals.
In carbonated drinks, acesulfame potassium is almost always used in conjunction with another sweetener, such as aspartame or sucralose.
Cancer Research UK said: "Large studies have provided strong evidence artificial sweeteners are safe." Hardly any aspartame enters the bloodstream as it is quickly broken down in digestion.
I threw the 12-pack back on the shelf, then started wondering: How long have I been unwittingly consuming aspartame? The February 2018 issue of AdAge provided some answers, noting, "PepsiCo--which faced a consumer backlash after it pulled aspartame from Diet Pepsi in 2015--is making a full reversal and will once again use the controversial sweetner [sic] in the soda's mainstream variety."
"If you go on the internet and look up aspartame, the layperson would be convinced that aspartame is going to make them fat, but it's not," said Stanhope.
We can thank Donald Rumsfeld for creating this medical crisis when he called in his political markers to have aspartame approved by the FDA.
I personally never buy any product containing aspartame. This is becoming increasingly difficult, as almost every soft drink now contains it!
The latest version of Diet Pepsi with aspartame will hit shelves in September.
HYET Sweet was founded in 2009 and since then has specialised in the supply of sweeteners, which include: Aspartame, Sucralose, Acesulfame-K and Stevia.
Aspartame (APM) is an artificial sweetener widespread in the world which is used in many food products like chewing gum, desserts, yoghurts, vitamins, medicines and particularly in diet beverages.
AIMS & OBJECTIVES: The present study has been planned to observe the biofilm production of Streptococcus mutans over a biosurface and to assess the influence of aspartame on biofilm production over that surface.