assertion

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assertion

(programming)
1. An expression which, if false, indicates an error. Assertions are used for debugging by catching can't happen errors.

2. In logic programming, a new fact or rule added to the database by the program at run time. This is an extralogical or impure feature of logic programming languages.
References in classic literature ?
26th, with another note to Percival, warning him to show his wife her uncle's letter of invitation, to assert that Marian had gone on before her, and to despatch her to town by the midday train, on the 26th, also.
Hartright attempted to assert that identity, they would publicly expose themselves to the imputation of sustaining a rank deception, they would be distrusted and discredited accordingly, and they would therefore be powerless to place my interests or Percival's secret in jeopardy.
I stand here on a supreme moral elevation, and I loftily assert her accurate performance of her conjugal duties.
My purpose in speaking to Canadians in all provinces and territories is to make the case that the best way to assert Canadian sovereignty in the region is through its residents.
In a friend-of-the-court brief, Moore's group asserts that the provision in the First Amendment barring laws "respecting an establishment of religion" protects no individual rights--a position that has been adopted by Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.
8) But their risky behavior likely masks a gross neglect of their ability to assert themselves.
However, it requires a leap of faith--which, so far, only Machtan has been willing to make--to take the next step and assert that Hitler was obviously a practicing homosexual.
To illustrate, a court is unlikely to assert jurisdiction over Web sites that merely show the benefits of products.
While she asserts that "the apocalypse, as text or as effect, is a quintessentially male product" (28), she reminds feminists that they, too, must come to terms with their own dependency on the apocalyptic script.
The first, relating to the actual use of deadly force, asserts that because an officer's decision to use deadly force violated the department's policy the action constitutes an unreasonable use of force under the Fourth Amendment.
Originally developed for the UK MOD Air Support Operating Centre, ASSERT is currently helping to improve the efficiency and quality of safety and environmental performance reporting within four key Operating Centres (Air Support, Combat Air, Helicopters and Ships).