assertion

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assertion

(programming)
1. An expression which, if false, indicates an error. Assertions are used for debugging by catching can't happen errors.

2. In logic programming, a new fact or rule added to the database by the program at run time. This is an extralogical or impure feature of logic programming languages.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the following examples, C1 illustrates an odd and unacceptable assertional conversational frame, C2 a simple case of supposing, and C3 a simple case of betting.
where K is the conceptual domain objects ontology; T is a terminological axioms; A is an assertional axioms.
We describe the facts by using the assertional language, as follows: (1) A(C): To specify that A is an instance of class C, for example: CauseConflict(CauseConflict_1).
A [f.sub.KD]-SHIN knowledge base [SIGMA] is a triple (T,R,A), where T is a fuzzy TBox (Terminological Box), R is a fuzzy RBox (Role Box) and A is a fuzzy ABox (Assertional Box).
Jeopardy clues are straightforward assertional forms of questions.
As general characteristics we suggested that these systems therefore contained very specific information about the properties of the Figure object (the subject of the clause) and had an assertional force about the current shape/disposition of the Figure.
The assertional phrase analysis examined relationships between concepts for the types of statements that were made.
SCHNEIDER'S book, On Concurrent Programming (Springer-Verlag, 1997), discusses how assertional reasoning can be used in the analysis and development of concurrert programs.
In case of integrated assertional axioms the set T [subset or equal to] K contains at least two assertional axioms sets [A.sub.l] [not subset or equal to] A: [A.sub.l] [not equal to] [empty set], in which individuals were defined, in these assertional axioms set the individuals equivalence of different ontologies [K.sub.l] should be defined in assertional axioms terms (5).
sell agent person recipient person patient thing I identified a distinction between assertional links, which assert facts, versus structural links, that merely build up parts of a description of something about which something else may be asserted.