assimilation and accommodation

assimilation and accommodation

(in PIEGET's theory of CHILD DEVELOPMENT) the means by which changes in conceptual schemata come about.

Fundamental to Piaget's stage theory of cognitive development is the idea that each stage has a typical mode of thinking, called a conceptual schema. For development to take place these schemata change, the next type of schema emerging out of the current schema. This change takes place either by new experiences being assimilated by the current schema, which becomes fuller and more elaborated as a result, or by accommodation, which is necessary if the current schema cannot fully deal with new experiences and needs to make a fundamental change in order to do so.

References in periodicals archive ?
Knowledge acquisition supposes an active process of conceptual assimilation and accommodation leading to adaptation to the social environment (Piaget, 1959).
Piaget explains that action schemes are the products of assimilation and accommodation processes in which previous acquired procedures are applied to new situations.
The answer is the constructs of assimilation and accommodation. To understand how the constructs of assimilation and accommodation influence counselors-in-training acquisition of an organized framework for counseling that assures internal consistency in case conceptualization, treatment planning, counseling practice and expected outcomes within the supervisory process may propel a more adequate response to supervision challenges within the trainee-client-and-supervisor triad (Magnuson & Wilcoxon, 1998; Neufeldt, Iverson, & Juntunen.
According to Piaget (1970), adaptation comprises two overlapping components: assimilation and accommodation. The process of assimilation and accommodation guide the development of cognition.
The inability to find a balance between assimilation and accommodation makes the movement from stage I to stage II delicate for supervisors.
The model is based on constructivist principles, including the subjectivity of the learning process, and assimilation and accommodation (i.e., blind exploration will involve a problematic situation for the student and solving it will advance the knowledge creating process), as well as some aspects of Ausubel's Significant Learning Theory.
In order to progress developmentally, individuals must balance the interconnected processes of assimilation and accommodation. One can see this most clearly in the need for autonomy on the one hand, while maintaining a sense of intimacy and connectedness to others.
In the workplace, assimilation and accommodation are of equal importance and must always occur together in a mutually dependent way.