assist

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assist

Baseball the act of a player who throws or deflects a batted ball in such a way that a team is enabled to put out an opponent
References in periodicals archive ?
As life expectancy increases and the over-65 population expands, assisted living housing has become a popular option.
Very simply, the Criminal Code of Canada completely prohibits both euthanasia and assisted suicide.
Circuit Court districts, challenging the constitutionality of laws criminalizing assisted suicide.
In 1991 Derek Humphrey and the Hemlock Society published Final Exit: The Practicalities of Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide and this suicide cook-book became a runaway best-seller.
Rehabilitation may be conceived as an interactive process whereby people with a wide range of impairments and disabilities (i.e., physical, mental, affective, social, and behavioral) are assisted (e.g., physically, psychosocially, vocationally) in improving the quality of their lives (Crewe, 1980), despite internally and externally imposed limiting conditions and scarce opportunities (Stubbins, 1984).
M2 EQUITYBITES-April 17, 2015-The Ensign Group buys three Idaho Assisted Living Facilities for an undisclosed amount
* More consolidation is afoot in the assisted living industry ...
Just one year after he completed and quickly sold out a showcase 438-unit cooperative housing and recreational community for seniors known as The Meadows at Mitchell Field, developer Jan Burman, president of Syosset-based Lazarus Burman Associates, in partnership with Lynbrook developer Sydney Engel, has broken ground on a neighboring vacant tract at the corner of Hempstead Turnpike and Merrick Avenue for a state-of-the-art assisted living development.
Upholding laws in New York and Washington States, which make it a crime for doctors to give life-ending drugs to terminally ill patients, he said that "the history of the law's treatment of assisted suicide in this country has been and continues to be one of rejection of nearly all efforts to permit it." So assistance in committing suicide is not a matter of fundamental liberty.
Almost two years later, on April 15, 1975, twenty-one-year-old Quinlan, in a coma of mysterious origin, was admitted to a New Jersey hospital Five months later, after doctors refused her parents' request that she be removed from the ventilator that assisted her breathing, Quinlan's parents began legal proceedings.
This may be the best year in a long while for assisted living providers who want to take advantage of capital flows into the industry.