delivery

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delivery

1. Sport
a. the act or manner of bowling or throwing a ball
b. the ball so delivered
2. Law an actual or symbolic handing over of property, a deed, etc.
3. Engineering the discharge rate of a compressor or pump
4. (in South Africa) the supply of basic services to communities deprived under apartheid
References in periodicals archive ?
An overall assisted delivery rate of <1% is too low and is probably due to loss of skill in performing AVD and/or lack of willingness to perform it, as well as lack of the necessary equipment.
Most CHCs could not perform an assisted delivery or manual vacuum aspiration for a spontaneous incomplete miscarriage, but all had magnesium sulphate and oxytocics.
The national assisted delivery rate is less than 1%, [1] compared with 13% in a low-risk population in the UK.
The predominant mode of delivery in different categories of polyhydramnios is normal vaginal delivery and nearly one tenth of such pregnancies are delivered by either cesarean section or instrument assisted delivery.
A need to identify the RN's responsibilities when encountering an uncomplicated, spontaneous assisted delivery in the ED was expressed by two patient care specialists (PCS) working in two different off site campuses.
Children born late are generally larger, and more often need a Caesarian section or an assisted delivery.
Experts found that an epidural, or combined spinal epidural and inhaled gas and air, effectively managed pain in labour but resulted in higher rates of assisted delivery, the Daily Express reported.
FDA public health advisory: need for caution when using vacuum assisted delivery devices.
His research reveals that rates of assisted delivery at Ysbyty Glan Clwyd are the highest in the country.
Risk factors for OBPP include macrosomia, assisted delivery or breech presentation, prolonged labor, excessive maternal weight gain, cephalopelvic disproportion, and subsequent shoulder dystocia.
The study found eating a light meal during labour has no effect on the duration of labour, the need for assisted delivery, or Caesarean rates.
Duration of labour, the need for assisted delivery and Cesarean rates were all unaffected by snacking between contractions.