device

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device

1. a machine or tool used for a specific task; contrivance
2. any ornamental pattern or picture, as in embroidery
3. computer hardware that is designed for a specific function
4. a particular pattern of words, figures of speech, etc., used in literature to produce an effect on the reader

device

[di′vīs]
(computer science)
A general-purpose term used, often indiscriminately, to refer to a computer component or the computer itself.
(electronics)
An electronic element that cannot be divided without destroying its stated function; commonly applied to active elements such as transistors and transducers.
(engineering)
A mechanism, tool, or other piece of equipment designed for specific uses.

device

In an electric system, a component that is intended to carry, but not consume, electric energy, e.g., a switch.

device

device

(1) Hardware. The term refers to any electronic or electromechanical machine or component from a transistor to a disk drive to a smartphone. A device always refers to hardware, never to software. However, a "device driver" refers to software written to activate (to drive) a specific hardware device (see driver).

A User or Client Device
In general conversation, "the user's device" refers to the hardware operated by a person and may refer to a smartphone, tablet, iPod, laptop or desktop computer, but not to devices in a network (see network device).

(2) In semiconductor design, a device is an active component, such as a transistor or diode, in contrast to a passive component, such as a resistor or capacitor.
References in periodicals archive ?
The resolution noted that "assistive technology devices and services are not luxury items but necessities for millions of people with disabilities and older adults, without which they would be unable to live in their communities, access education, and obtain, retain, and advance gainful, competitive integrated employment,"
The number of assistive technology devices that have the potential to empower individuals with disabilities has increased in recent years.
The term assistive technology service means "any service that directly assists an individual with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device."
"Assistive technology service" means any service that directly assists a child with a disability in the selection, acquisition, or use of an assistive technology device. Such term includes--
(42) The IDEA includes a mandate that for every student eligible for special education services, the team developing the student's IEP must consider whether the student needs "assistive technology devices and services." (43) The IDEA also contains procedural safeguards intended to protect the rights of students and parents, including the right to challenge a school district's decisions at an impartial hearing.
It is the responsibility of the local school district to pay for any assistive technology device or service included in the student's IEP.
In its press release announcing the new initiative, CoSN explains that an assistive technology device, as defined by the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), means any item, piece of equipment or product system, whether acquired commercially, modified or customized, that is used to increase, maintain or improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability.
The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 1997 defines an assistive technology device as "any item, piece of equipment, or product system ...
"As used in this part, assistive technology device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability" (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, 1999, [section] 300.5, from IDEA Practices, 2003).
Federal legislation defines an assistive technology device as "any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve functional capabilities of children with disabilities."[3] These devices may include such low-tech devices as pencil grips, picture boards, taped instructions, and workbooks, or high-tech devices such as alternative keyboards, listening aids, speech-synthesis devices, voice recognition systems, data managers, talking calculators, variable speed tape recorders, and optical character recognition systems.
Outcome measures should address the individual's quality of life and the impact of the assistive technology device on the individual's occupational performance (Lenker et al., 2005; Scherer et al., 2005).

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