Associate

(redirected from associability)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

associate

[ə′sō·sē‚āt]
(psychology)
An item or event that is linked to another in the mind of an individual.

Associate

Closely connected as in function or office, but having secondary or subordinate status; an architect who has an arrangement with another architect to collaborate in the performance of service for a project, or a series of projects.

associate

In an architectural firm, a member of an architect’s staff who has a special employment agreement.
References in periodicals archive ?
Their statements do closely approximate formal state documents of what the centers are meant to achieve, namely increased confidence, literacy, and associability.
Pavlov and the equivalence of associability in classical conditioning.
The results of Experiment 2 provide no evidence that swim can increase attention or associability to an extinguished CS.
2007); d) finally, in the same vein as the works by Meehl (1962; 1990), associability seems to be a structure of a taxometric nature (Horan et al.
Associability results, in part, from a high degree of interdependence among members, as well as from "general understandings of work organization, implicit norms, and generalized, resilient trust" (Leana & Van Buren, 1999, p.
37) Transcendental affinity is the associability of different elements in the manifold of intuition had in virtue of the fact that all manifolds conform to the a priori laws for ordering representations issuing from the subject.
Increased training should affect only to [alpha], the parameter that determines the associability of the context, decreasing it to zero.
Hall & Pearce, 1979, 1982) confirmed the generality of the finding and led us to adopt the general principle that training in which a cue was reliably followed by a given consequence would cause that cue to lose associability.
AK] is multiplied by [alpha] and [beta], which represent the associability of A and e, respectively.
The associability is not brought into being by the actual associating of the elements.
Studies have clearly shown that uncorrelated presentations of a stimulus and a particular reinforcer often result in a dramatic decrease in the associability of that stimulus with that reinforcer (Mackintosh, 1973).

Full browser ?