associative thinking

associative thinking

[ə′sō·sē‚ād·iv ′thiŋk·iŋ]
(psychology)
The mental process of making associations between a given subject and all pertinent present factors without drawing on past experience.
Free association.
References in periodicals archive ?
As such there is an increase in associative thinking when an athlete makes the switch from training to racing that is seemingly independent of exercise time and intensity.
People have outstanding skills in pattern recognition, associative thinking, and forms of natural sense-making.
Here, the form of Gander's associative thinking, which he's explored over the past decade, has been hollowed of all content--possibly freeing up your gaze to take in the nearby designer chair on which a guard is sitting.
Quoting from Dr Hal Gregorsen's Book (the Innovator's DNA) this includes: Courage, Observation Skills, Questioning, Networking and then the ability to synthesise this into Associative Thinking.
While it does assert "life lessons," it does so through the quick associative thinking of brief anecdote and summation, and so avoids the typical memoir's labored endgame.
Such sculpting may replicate associative thinking as well as emphasize phrasal ("is still a self," and "is still a bell") and structural repetitions.
These inadvertent, natural Rorschachs rekindled my long-standing interest in associative thinking and investing the work with psychological resonances.
Van Gogh was not just a poet, but an artist whose prodigious visual memory buttressed his associative thinking.
There is empirical evidence now that information overload and associative thinking may be reshaping how they think.
The former happens because, if you stay in control by being utterly rational, you will reject nonlinear or associative thinking and forgo using intuition, even though many creative people credit intuition as the source of their discoveries.
At the same time, adherents of DA were typically dismissive of emotions and associative thinking or the value of gut instinct.
Cro-Magnons were the first group of hominids classified as Homo sapiens and possessed a large frontal lobe capable of associative thinking.