assortative mating


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assortative mating

[ə′sȯrd·əd·iv ¦mād·iŋ]
(genetics)
Nonrandom mating with respect to phenotypes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Zafar, "Educational Assortative Mating and Household Income Inequality" NBER Working Paper No.
"What assortative mating means here is that the factors that are important for life span tend to be very similar between mates," says Ruby.
While assortative mating is compatible with different preference-determination mechanisms--including purely genetic transmission and "innate" preferences--assimilation can only be explained if preferences can change and react to social cues.
Bimodal hybrid zones are typically associated with assortative mating so, in tree weta, reproductive character displacement is a likely outcome that increases assortative mating (Dieckmann and Doebeli 1999, Jiggins and Mallet 2000).
More generally, and especially in this section of the book, it is obvious that Gilbert is well-read on the literature, for example, on Head Start's limited effectiveness (100-103), Charles Murray's discussion of "assortative mating" in Coming Apart (103, 107), inter-generational income mobility (109-15), and Social Security's low rate of return and its funding problems (131, 139-41).
Good article but it doesn't mention that in addition to assortative mating, capital concentration, etc., this elite has done a fine job of good old-fashioned rigging the system in its own favor (e.g., public bailouts for banks, endless DoD bucks for Silicon Valley).
To the extent that range expansion is likely to be linked to climate change, this theory creates a plausible link between this breakdown of assortative mating and larger climatic patterns.
Yet another possible explanation for rates of partner distress in military-connected families is assortative mating or nonrandom mating that takes place between partners who have similar characteristics, personalities, physical traits, health outcomes, and even health behaviors (Monson, Taft, & Fredman, 2009).
where W (wages) of individual i is the dependent variable; I is a vector of individual characteristics (gender; educational attainment; age and age squared, the latter to capture possible nonlinearities, proxying general experience); H captures household characteristics, for example ability/genetic endowment (assortative mating) or the networks available to the household; and C is a vector of community variables (geographical location, municipal-non-municipal location, and region).
2008), laboratory rearing regime (which also disrupts synchrony) (Weldon 2005), the laboratory colony being lab-adapted in a way that promotes assortative mating (Calkins & Parker 2005), population size of E.