astringent

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astringent

(əstrĭn`jənt), substance that shrinks body tissues. Astringent medicines cause shrinkage of mucous membranes or exposed tissues and are often used internally to check discharge of serum or mucous secretions in sore throat, hemorrhage, diarrhea, or peptic ulcer. Externally applied astringents, which cause mild coagulation of skin proteins, dry, harden, and protect the skin. Mildly astringent solutions are used in the relief of such minor skin irritations as those resulting from superficial cuts, allergies, insect bites, or athlete's foot. Astringent preparations include silver nitrate, zinc oxide, calamine lotion, tincture of benzoin, and vegetable substances such as tannic and gallic acids, catechu, and oak bark. Some metal salts and acids have also been used as astringents.

astringent

[ə′strin·jənt]
(medicine)
A substance applied to produce local contraction of blood vessels, to shrink mucous membranes, or to check discharges such as serum or mucus.

astringent

a drug or medicine causing contraction of body tissues, checking blood flow, or restricting secretions of fluids
References in periodicals archive ?
As considering the information provided above, the aimed to verify the effect of astringency reduction using ethanol and application of 1-MCP in 'Giombo' persimmons and storage at 5[degrees]C and to assess its physiological and structural alterations.
Crowley observes although whole-wheat pasta promotes heart health and provides antioxidants not found in refined pastas, its distinct astringency, texture and "non-fermentable fiber" content keep it out of the mainstream.
BITTERNESS: Most beers are intentionally bitter but on rare occasions a brewing flaw can produce a taste of excessive bitterness, or astringency.
The play's fussy astringency about relationships evokes Albee at his most baroque, while its indifference to dramatic credibility recalls the campy least of McNally.
While the composers of the Baltic region are by no means stylistically interchangeable, there is a certain something--call it astringency, or maybe asceticism, though neither adjective applies equally to all of them--that makes these works easily recognizable as products of their geographic area.
This is both an advantage and a limitation, for while it enables him, in "Autumn Marriage," to handle undeclared domestic wars with a Gravesian astringency and clear-eyed restraint, or, in "Operation," to confront the aftermath of an abortion with a combination of wrenching honesty and compassion, the themes of his poetry reveal a narrowness of focus and too often a homogeneity of tone.
A place where the aroma of fresh bread meets up with the astringency of detergents.
The immediate impression is of menace, fuelled by architectonic imbalance and astringency. The rooftop study centre looms out precariously over the corner and the steep flight of steps leading up to the entrance is sheltered by a jutting, claw-shaped canopy.
The composition effectively masks the burn sensation and astringency of eucalyptol and zinc, executives said.
Marked astringency is balanced by parma violet and bramble fruit plus that trademark Italian roasted aftertaste.