astrocytoma


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Related to astrocytoma: glioma, anaplastic astrocytoma

astrocytoma

[‚as·trə‚sī′tōm·ə]
(medicine)
A slow-growing glial tumor made up of cells resembling astrocytes; often it will undergo malignant change and assume the appearance and growth characteristics of a glioblastoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glioma is the most common type of brain tumor which accounts for approximately half of all the astrocytoma. The increasing occurrence of glioblastoma over the years is responsible for the growth of the glioma diagnosis and treatment market.
Histopathologically, 19 cases were diagnosed with oligodendrogliomas (31.6%), 10 with anaplastic oligodendrogliomas (16.6%), 19 with oligoastrocytomas (31.6%), 8 with anaplastic oligoastrocytomas (13.3%), 2 with A (3%), and 2 with anaplastic astrocytoma (3%).
One case of spinal astrocytoma was diagnosed as ependymoma on crush cytology, while one case each of cerebellopontine angle schwannoma and cerebellar hemangioblastoma were misinterpreted as meningioma and benign mesenchymal tumor, respectively [Table 3].
The patent covers administering Plinabulin for treatment methods by which the brain tumor is metastatic, anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme, oligodendroglioma, ependymomas or a combination thereof, with patent protection until 2036.
The team of scientists examined brain tissue from 22 astrocytoma patients at the Hospital of University Sains Malaysia.
Afinitor is the only approved non-surgical option indicated for treating TSC-associated non-cancerous brain tumors (subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, or SEGA) and TSC-associated kidney tumors (renal angiomyolipoma).
Increased Cho/Cr ratio, decreased NAA and presence of lactate.6 Astrocytomas are classified into low grade, anaplastic and GBM (Glioblastoma Multiforme).7 Grading of astrocytoma is essential for the decision of surgery, post-operative adjuvant treatment and functional outcome.8 Accurate pre-operative diagnosis is of immense importance in planning the limits of maximal safe resection.9 A patient diagnosed as a case of primary brain tumor has concerns regarding complete resection for which the pre-operative diagnosis is very important.10 This study was designed to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MRI and MRS in diagnosis of characteristics of brain tumors and comparing it with the final histopathological diagnosis.
According to final diagnosis after surgery or biopsy, all patients who met the criteria were classified into the following two groups: Group A (benign), which included patients who were diagnosed as low-grade astrocytoma, grade II including a case of recurrent grade II glioma or less, or other low-grade astrocytomas (n = 12; ranging from 5 to 46 years, mean age 32.2 [+ or -] 10.0 years; seven males and five females); Group B (malignant), which included patients who were diagnosed as anaplastic astrocytoma, glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), or recurrent GBM despite prior surgery or chemoradiotherapy (n = 19; ranging from 14 to 71 years, mean age 56.7 [+ or -] 16.8 years; nine males and ten females).
Anaplastic pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (APXA), an extremely rare primary brain tumour, is a WHO grade III astrocytoma histologically defined by increased mitotic activity ([greater than or equal to] 5 mitoses /10 high-power field), with or without necrosis, and clinically notorious for its poor prognostic outcome compared to its benign variant the pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma (PXA), a low-grade astrocytoma with more favourable prognosis first described by Kepes et al.
Infiltrating gliomas, when discussed from a histologic and historical frame of reference, consist of 2 broad classes of tumors, originally designated based on their morphologic characteristics alone that recall 2 nonneoplastic glial cell types: oligodendrogliomas and infiltrating astrocytomas. The latter group excludes noninfiltrating astrocytomas, such as pilocytic astrocytoma, subependymal giant cell astrocytoma, and pleomorphic xanthoastrocytoma.
Only 1% to 2% of all brain tumours occur in children under 2 years of age which include primitive neuroectodermal tumour, teratoma, astrocytoma and choroid plexus carcinoma.