asymmetric cryptography


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asymmetric cryptography

A very popular encryption method that uses two keys. When a message is sent to the only person entitled to view it, the recipient's public key is used by the sender to encrypt, and the recipient's secret key is used to decrypt.

With digital signatures, the sender's private key is used to encrypt a digest of the message, and the sender's public key is used to decrypt. See public key cryptography, digital signature and RSA.
References in periodicals archive ?
are the pioneers to utilize CUDA floating-pointing processing power in asymmetric cryptography implementations [5].
Comparison of symmetric and asymmetric cryptography with existing vulnerabilities and countermeasures.
In 1993 new ideas appeared in asymmetric cryptography [6]--using known hard computational problems in infinite non-commutative groups instead of hard number theory problems such as discrete logarithm or integer factorization problems.
According to the information of this work, asymmetric cryptography brings many disadvantages when used in key distribution protocols.
Asymmetric cryptography has the drawback of being relatively computation and communication intensive.
Coverage includes the mathematical basics of symmetric and asymmetric cryptography, the synthesis of block ciphers, and software-oriented ciphers.
(6) Digital signatures are based on public key technology, a special form of encryption invented in the 1970s, which uses two different keys (as two different keys are used, this form of encryption is also known as asymmetric cryptography).
A digital signature relies on the mathematically complex world of asymmetric cryptography. In use for many years to provide encryption of messages for security, the same technology is used to create a virtual signature.
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