asymptotic freedom


Also found in: Wikipedia.

asymptotic freedom

[ā‚sim′täd·ik ′frēd·əm]
(particle physics)
In some gauge theories, the property of the strong interactions of growing steadily weaker at high energies.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Hence the increasing field can exist over the whole universe keeping asymptotic freedom in our short range environment, while being effective far away.
Gauge theories like Quantum Electrodynamics (QED), the electroweak sector of the Standard Model (SM) of particle physics as a whole, and the primary perturbative vertices of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) describing, e.g., the creation of jets of hadrons from electron-positron annihilation at large center-of-mass energies thanks to asymptotic freedom are empirically very successful applications of this approach.
Discovery of asymptotic freedom in the theory of strong interactions of elementary particles.
While strong supporting evidence for the particle physics theory of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) has been found in high energy collisions in experimental tests using perturbativetreatments because of its asymptotic freedom behavior, the perturbative procedures have proven problematic for low-energy QCD, since the running coupling constant goes beyond 1.
Among the areas they consider are breaking the symmetry, towards the standard model, renormalization, asymptotic freedom, quark confinement and strings, the lattice, confrontation with experiments, and supersymmetry and supergravity.
It explains things like asymptotic freedom, quarks, coins spinning on a table, and the way subatomic particles behave with gravity -- all things I admit I've never spent a second wondering about.
In 1973, when Gross and Wilczek were at Princeton University and Politzer was at Harvard University, the throe researchers independently discovered a property of the strong interaction that they called "asymptotic freedom." According to this phenomenon, the force of attraction between quarks actually gets weaker when the quarks are close together.
In this regard, the Callan-Symanzik equation was fundamental to determine the asymptotic freedom of QCD [16-19].
Exploring how natural scientists have integrated notions of human free will into their models of the world, he ponders such matters as the age of neuroscience and the end of freedom; complexity, spontaneity, and social behaviors in biological evolution; freedom and the emergence of culture; forms of freedom, as-if freedom, and asymptotic freedom as a challenge to neurophilosophy; a speech to the scientifically cultured despisers of religion; and freedom and transcendence.

Full browser ?