asynchronous

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asynchronous

[ā′siŋ·krə·nəs]
(computer science)
Operating at a speed determined by the circuit functions rather than by timing signals.
(physics)
Not synchronous.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

asynchronous

(architecture)
Not synchronised by a shared signal such as clock or semaphore, proceeding independently.

Opposite: synchronous.

1. <operating system> A process in a multitasking system whose execution can proceed independently, "in the background". Other processes may be started before the asynchronous process has finished.

2. <communications> A communications system in which data transmission may start at any time and is indicated by a start bit, e.g. EIA-232. A data byte (or other element defined by the protocol) ends with a stop bit. A continuous marking condition (identical to stop bits but not quantized in time), is then maintained until data resumes.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

asynchronous

Events that are not synchronized or coordinated in time. All the following are asynchronous operations. The interval between transmitting A and B is not the same as between B and C. The ability to initiate a transmission at either end. Storing and forwarding messages. Starting the next operation before the current one is completed. Contrast with synchronous.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The outcome sequence of getting points in the single-response task was identical to those of the two-choice or the five-choice tasks in both the synchronism and the asynchronism groups.
Indicator dating is justified by the asynchronism that the economic variables show in their cyclical evolution.
Twice in the poem Hill invokes Oskar Kokoschka's 1936 portrait of Thomas Masaryk (now in the Carnegie Museum in Pittsburgh), itself emblematic of historical asynchronism: Masaryk's
We are therefore in the presence of an asynchronism: a decline in religious doctrines in Western and Central Europe and a resurgence elsewhere.
If facial expression is the main means of communication, even slight asynchronism between the voice and the movement of eyes and lips is immediately noticed, and makes smooth conversation difficult.
Sekaran (1986) took a different approach by focusing on the synchronism or asynchronism of the couple; synchronized couples accommodate the other, whereas asynchronized couples find that their careers are continually out of sync due to one career beginning later than the other, one career making slower progress than the other, etc.
The idea of asynchronism in the two-career relationship is probed in Uma Sekaran and Douglas T.