asystole

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asystole

[ā′sis·tə·lē]
(medicine)
The absence of cardiac contraction; cardiac arrest.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The court held, inter alia, that according to expert testimony by the plaintiff's board certified emergency physician, the defendants departed from accepted practice by failing to intubate the patient and timely administer advanced life support medications, and added to it by the inappropriate administration of electrical defibrillation to an asystolic patient.
The ISSUE 2 study (10) indicates that the patients with asystolic tilt response are likely to benefit more from pacing therapy because their spontaneous syncope is also asystolic.
Three minutes after this event, Jane became asystolic. She was pronounced dead at 1722.
Surgical decompression can lead to serious side effects, including massive washout of anaerobic products, severe hypotension and asystolic arrest.
In the early morning hours of October 14, 2000, the patient, although on a ventilator, was found asystolic and unresponsive.
Once a patient enters an asystolic state, where there is no electrical activity in the heart, recovery is rare.
A second, weaker construal is that "loss of function cannot be reversed by those present at this time." Data show that cardiopulmonary function can be restored easily in persons who have been asystolic for ten to fifteen minutes in typical clinical situations and longer in experimental and transplant conditions.[17] Thus Cole's second construal of irreversibility would require waiting at least fifteen minutes after the loss of circulation to declare death, and probably longer.
Within one hour, the patient's heart rate rapidly decreased, leading to a six-second asystolic pause.
In this case, we get a failure to pace with consequent asystolic pause (cross talk) if there is not a spontaneous ventricular depolarization (Fig.
-- Despite dramatic advances in technology, techniques, and emergency response systems, children who go into asystolic cardiac arrest still have very high death rates, and the few who survive often suffer brain damage.