right angle

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right angle

the angle between two radii of a circle that cut off on the circumference an arc equal in length to one quarter of the circumference; an angle of 90? or π/2 radians
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

right angle

[′rīt ′aŋ·gəl]
(mathematics)
An angle of 90°.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

right angle

An angle of 90°.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If we take only the 3 cm one-dimensional line segment and move it at right angles up the page for just 3 cm, then we get a square.
I have found it more difficult to accommodate differential signal polarity in PCB routing for edge-coupled lines on connectors whose signal pin pairs are oriented parallel (rather than at right angles) to the connector body.
Trainers usually emphasize moving at right angles to exit a kill zone.
The rod is in turn welded at right angles to a solid steel post measuring 1" in diameter.
Seemingly emblematic of "the troubles" themselves, the two wall-sized projections that comprised Irish artist Willie Doherty's video installation, The Only Good One Is A Dead One, 1994, were shown, symbolically, at right angles from each other.
When the crystal was at right angles to its original direction, only the other ray of light appeared, the first having disappeared.
Locating parting lines either along or at right angles to cutting-contour lines easily avoids acute angles.
The cylinder of the council chamber forms part of a secondary three-storey block that protrudes at right angles into the bermed car park from the main five-storey body of the building.
The ubiquitous building material owes its strength to multiple wood sheets with their grains at right angles and tenaciousxglue between the layers.
For this processor, that would have meant redoing its plant layout and repositioning extruders at right angles to the production line.
The reasonable thing to do was to create landmarks, so Eudoxus drew imaginary lines diverging out from the pole star, and other imaginary lines meeting the first set at right angles. The diverging lines are what we now call longitude, and the ones at right angles are latitude.