atheroma

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Related to Atheromatous plaque: atherosclerosis, aneurysm

atheroma

[‚ath·ə′rōm·ə]
(medicine)
A lipid deposit in the inner wall of an artery; characteristic of atherosclerosis.
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There was no significant difference in the prevalence of carotid atheromatous plaques between the two subgroups of 25(OH)D levels.
The present study is the first to demonstrate that combination therapy with SGLT2i and DPP-4i synergistically suppresses macrophage foam cell formation in type 2 diabetic mice and atheromatous plaque formation in diabetic, dyslipidemic mice.
In the thoracic and abdominal portions, we evaluated the total length of the fragment (Et), the length of the atheromatous plaque base (Ep), and its total area (AP).
(i) Local expression: numerous studies report the presence of mCRP mRNA in various extrahepatic tissues, including adipocytes, smooth muscle cells, and inflammatory cells within atheromatous plaques. However, mechanisms for synthesis of subunits and their assembly into pCRP remain unclear.
Identification of pathogens in atheromatous plaques. J Periodontol 2000; 71:1554-1560
However, due to additional positive effects observed in these patients, many chelation therapists claim that EDTA is capable of removing calcium from atheromatous plaques in the circulatory system.
Finally, blood vessel walls may become weakened, often, but not exclusively, by an atheromatous plaque, leading to the formation of a sac-like protrusion of the vessel wall (Figure 5).
Regardless of the thrombotic risk, it would seem likely that the lipid abnormalities often seen with protease inhibitor-based therapy, would increase the risk of atheromatous plaque formation, also narrowing arterial supply to the penis.
The condition can be caused by atheromatous plaque microemboli (microscopic pieces of cholesterol-laden plaque) that break off and block the tiny blood vessels in the toes, trapping blood in the toes, leading to the purplish color.
The Committee suggested the inhalations of particles found in the air causes chemical reactions in the body to take place which increase the likelihood of blood to clot and/or atheromatous plaque to rupture, leading to a heart attack.
In the present case, this appears to be a possible mechanism in which myocardial lesions corresponded to acute occlusion of left anterior descending artery perhaps favored by presence of an atheromatous plaque. Here coronary arteriography would have been the most useful investigation.
The goal of carotid endarterectomy is to prevent embolization and distal occlusion by removing atheromatous plaque located extracranially.