atmospheric scattering

atmospheric scattering

[¦at·mə¦sfir·ik ′skad·ər·iŋ]
(geophysics)
A change in the direction of propagation, frequency, or polarization of electromagnetic radiation caused by interaction with the atoms of the atmosphere.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are three steps according to the atmospheric scattering model.
So at present, the method based on image restoration is widely used, which establishes the atmospheric scattering model [3] and inverse image degradation process to improve the visual effect of foggy images.
From space, coronal plasma emissions are very clear out to several solar radii (Rs) from the Sun's surface because of the lack of atmospheric scattering.
The terrestrial radiation is attenuated by two different phenomena, (i) atmospheric scattering by air molecules, water vapor and aerosols, and (ii) atmospheric absorption by mainly ozone, water and carbon dioxide.
Ultraviolet B radiation is much more variable than ultraviolet A as latitude increases due to atmospheric scattering of the light and absorption by oxygen.
These models also appear to neglect atmospheric scattering [i.
Stronger atmospheric scattering of blue light means that the light that reaches the lunar surface is predominantly red in colour so observers on Earth saw the Moon to appear brick-coloured, rusty, blood-red or sometimes dark grey, depending on the terrestrial conditions.
Stronger atmospheric scattering of blue light means that the light that reaches the lunar surface is predominantly red in colour so observers on Earth see a moon that may be brick-coloured, rusty, blood-red or sometimes dark grey, depending on terrestrial conditions on the night.
Across the entire visible spectrum the angular separations are even greater, but the human eye is fairly insensitive to light at the extreme ends of the spectrum, and the blue and violet components are invariably attenuated because atmospheric scattering and absorption are more pronounced at short wavelengths.
Across the entire visible spectrum, the angular separations are even greater that the graph shows, but the human eye is fairly insensitive to light at the extreme ends of the spectrum, and the blue component is invariably attenuated because atmospheric scattering is far more pronounced at short wavelengths.
The blue component is often subdued or even absent because atmospheric scattering and adsorption are so much more pronounced at shorter wavelengths.
Blue flashes" are seen only rarely because our eyes have relatively low sensitivity to the blue light, which is already greatly diminished by atmospheric scattering.

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