atomic fission

atomic fission

[ə′täm·ik ′fish·ən]
(biology)
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Conventional nuclear power produces energy by atomic fission - splitting of the heavy atoms of uranium fuel.
For splitting of atoms, which emit neutrons and photons that trigger a chain reaction and produce energy, a team includes Indian and Russian scientists and engineers are monitoring the atomic fission.
and atomic fission is expected to finish in the afternoon, according to Chubu Electric.
One version of you may be sitting reading the ECHO right now, while another version of you exists - only your sex may be different - and you may be sitting in this parallel world reading a German copy of "der ECHO" because Hitler decided to conquer Britain instead of attacking Russia, and the Nazi Party - in this alternate strand of existence - managed to develop atomic fission before the US and launched A-bomb attacks on New York and Moscow with their long-range V2 rockets.
10pm) A conscience-stricken scientist steals a nuclear bomb and threatens to destroy London unless further research into atomic fission is stopped at once.
75) Consodine objected that a previous Stimson statement draft cited the nuclear physicist Enrico Fermi as a leading figure in the development of atomic fission.
CHILLING and tense thriller, starring Barry Jones as a conscience-stricken scientist who steals a nuclear bomb and threatens to destroy London unless further research into atomic fission is stopped at once.
He suggested that Campbell be told to reread the Code of Wartime Practices that had been sent confidentially to editors and broadcasters in 1943, telling them to avoid mentioning subjects such as "atom smashing, atomic energy, atomic fission, atomic splitting, or any of their equivalents.
Following ongoing trends of research, Kettering then foresees an era marked by research and further development of atomic fission, petroleum refining, metallurgy and plastics, the breaking of the sound barrier, studies using the recently-invented electron microscope, and advances in treatment of disease.
Bernstein gives us one of the most succinct explanations of atomic fission and fusion I have ever read, and he reveals for nonscientists what physicists have found to be so "technically sweet" about the way hydrogen bombs work.
Boyce McDaniel, a Cornell University physicist who was on the Manhattan Project and played a key rote in identifying the amount of uranium-235 needed to create the atomic fission that detonated the world's first nuclear bomb.
Based on an actual event, it traces a meeting between Bohr and Heisenberg - friends and colleagues who each did pioneering work on atomic fission.