atomic fission

atomic fission

[ə′täm·ik ′fish·ən]
(biology)
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How, for instance, will he express in Yoruba 'space-time continuum', 'Theory of relativity', 'light years', 'automatic rifle', 'atomic fission', 'galaxy', 'Milky Way', 'black hole', 'depth psychology' etc, etc?
Conventional nuclear power produces energy by atomic fission - splitting of the heavy atoms of uranium fuel.
In a letter dated August 2, 1939, Albert Einstein alerted President Roosevelt to the possibility that atomic fission may be harnessed to create a bomb.
For splitting of atoms, which emit neutrons and photons that trigger a chain reaction and produce energy, a team includes Indian and Russian scientists and engineers are monitoring the atomic fission.
and atomic fission is expected to finish in the afternoon, according to Chubu Electric.
One version of you may be sitting reading the ECHO right now, while another version of you exists - only your sex may be different - and you may be sitting in this parallel world reading a German copy of "der ECHO" because Hitler decided to conquer Britain instead of attacking Russia, and the Nazi Party - in this alternate strand of existence - managed to develop atomic fission before the US and launched A-bomb attacks on New York and Moscow with their long-range V2 rockets.
SEVEN DAYS TO NOON (Channel 4, 1.10pm) A conscience-stricken scientist steals a nuclear bomb and threatens to destroy London unless further research into atomic fission is stopped at once.
(75) Consodine objected that a previous Stimson statement draft cited the nuclear physicist Enrico Fermi as a leading figure in the development of atomic fission. Fermi was a Nobel Laureate in physics and, when working at the University of Chicago's Metallurgical Laboratory (Metlab), constructed the first atomic pile in a graphite-moderated nuclear reactor.
CHILLING and tense thriller, starring Barry Jones as a conscience-stricken scientist who steals a nuclear bomb and threatens to destroy London unless further research into atomic fission is stopped at once.
Still, he continued, the story implied that the United States was conducting nuclear research and hoped to build atomic bombs, and such talk could "well provoke public speculation." He suggested that Campbell be told to reread the Code of Wartime Practices that had been sent confidentially to editors and broadcasters in 1943, telling them to avoid mentioning subjects such as "atom smashing, atomic energy, atomic fission, atomic splitting, or any of their equivalents." If Campbell failed to comply, perhaps his all-important periodicals-rate postage permit would expire.
Of 1940 to 1960, he first points to the rise in research, citing that "the number of scientific personnel in industrial research laboratories has nearly doubled since 1940." Following ongoing trends of research, Kettering then foresees an era marked by research and further development of atomic fission, petroleum refining, metallurgy and plastics, the breaking of the sound barrier, studies using the recently-invented electron microscope, and advances in treatment of disease.
Bernstein gives us one of the most succinct explanations of atomic fission and fusion I have ever read, and he reveals for nonscientists what physicists have found to be so "technically sweet" about the way hydrogen bombs work.