atomic hydrogen


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atomic hydrogen

[ə′täm·ik ′hī·drə·jən]
(chemistry)
Gaseous hydrogen whose molecules are dissociated into atoms.
References in periodicals archive ?
The diffusivity of atomic hydrogen [IQ] extrapolated down to 150[degrees]C is 1.4 x l[degrees]-8[cm.sup.2]/s (for the deuterium isotope).
It is expected that a small desorption maximum for A film at ~100[degrees]C may be related to additional desorption channel of atomic hydrogen in comparison with other films.
Umemoto et al., "Photoresist removal using atomic hydrogen generated by hot-wire catalyzer and effects on Si-wafer surface," Japanese Journal of Applied Physics, vol.
The latter result is a conclusion purely from experiment, specifically the numerological deduction made initially by Balmer in 1885 and elaborated on a more physical basis by Rydberg in 1888 from wave lengths [lambda]/m of spectral lines in the visible region attributed to atomic hydrogen. Balmer's formula is equivalent to
Interactions between halide ions and atomic hydrogen or deuterium have recently fascinated new interest and curiosity for low-energy collisions (below 8 eV) leading to associative attachment, a process important in many plasmas.
Among the topics are synthesizing zinc oxide nanoparticles by solid state reactions and its influence on a zinc electrode, the effect of isothermal treatment on the microstructure and properties of high performance steel, simulation and casting processes for ductile iron wind generator rotor shaft, effects of additives on semiconduction transformation in lead zirconate titanate ceramic induced by atomic hydrogen, tungsten cathodes doped with rare earth for pulsed xenon lamps, and the shielding effect in the sacrificial anode cathodic protection system.
First atomic hydrogen spectral line images of a nearby galaxy, 14 March 2012.
Dame found evidence for the new structure while reviewing galactic data on atomic hydrogen gas, which radiates at a radio wavelength of 21 centimeters.
Unfortunately, the existing network of (mostly natural gas) pipelines is constructed mainly of ferrous materials that are often embrittled by atomic hydrogen. Embrittlement by hydrogen can manifest itself in the form of reduced ductility and notch strengths or subcritical crack growth under monotonic loading, which is called "hydrogen embrittlement" (HE), and increased fatigue crack growth (rate(s)) (FCG(R)).
It is a type of hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) in which the primary poison is the evolution of atomic hydrogen. Process conditions involving wet hydrogen sulfide are called sour services.
Because of the contents and internal operating conditions under active stresses, the diffusion of atomic hydrogen occurs in areas of tensile stress concentration.