atomic particle

atomic particle

[ə′täm·ik ′pard·ə·kəl]
(atomic physics)
One of the particles of which an atom is constituted, as an electron, neutron, or proton.
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Content -- The Atomic Particle of Marketing: The Definitive Guide to Content Marketing Strategy
Dr Salam has come into lime light once again after the discovery of an atomic particle last year, which Salam had predicted some 35 years ago on the basis of his calculations.
Secondly, you just knew life as a sub atomic particle was on the cards the moment scientists reassured us that the Large Hadron Collider would not cause the planet to eat itself from the bowels out or turn into a huge blow-up caricature of Dickie Davies.
How the Vatican nearly went to meet its maker ANGELS & Demons, the companion volume to Dan Brown's blockbuster thriller, The Da Vinci Code, opens with the discovery of a murdered physicist at the CERN atomic particle laboratory.
The GEMINI TF is the first PET system to use atomic particle time-measurements to deliver increased image quality and consistency, helping earlier disease detection in patients.
London, Dec 23 (ANI): Large Hadron Collider has discovered a new sub atomic particle called Chi_b (3P), which can provide vital clues about elusive 'God particle' or Higgs boson.
London, June 11 (ANI): Tests recently conducted using a separate experiment called DZero have not been able to corroborate the findings claiming the discovery of a sub atomic particle.
In July and August 2015 she had led a group of older pupils on the trip to the CERN complex in Switzerland - home of the Large Hadron Collider where beams of atomic particles are smashed into each other.
It also balances the need for everyday durability with the desire for high-end luxury through the Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) manufacturing process, in which robust titanium material is vaporized into atomic particles and then layered atop stainless steel, creating an uncommonly strong, scratch-resistant surface.
Neutrinos, nature's most elusive atomic particles, could serve as a key to detecting other "suns" in the universe made of anti-matter, the opposite of the kind of matter found on earth, and in our sun.
New results out of Antarctica contradict the idea that the most energetic atomic particles hitting Earth's atmosphere come from gamma-ray bursts.
The collider produces tiny patches of high energy by colliding together atomic particles travelling at very high speed.