atomic vibration

atomic vibration

[ə′täm·ik ‚vī′brā·shən]
(atomic physics)
Periodic, nearly harmonic changes in position of the atoms in a molecule giving rise to many properties of matter, including molecular spectra, heat capacity, and heat conduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
A type of atomic vibration never before seen in ordinary solid materials has been observed in uranium.
The team used Raman spectroscopy to measure the atomic vibrations throughout a microscopic fossil of a protist, at a sub-micron resolution, and then analyzed the resulting spectra using their new analytic technique.
Objective: Phonons (collective atomic vibrations in solids) are more effective in transporting heat than photons.
The author explores crystal structure and crystal diffraction, crystal binding and elastic constants, atomic vibrations and lattice specific heat, free electrons theory and simple metals, and many other related subjects.
When you touch an object and it feels 'hot' you are literally sensing the 'buzzing' of the atomic vibrations.
But when it does, it's less likely to set another electron free than it is to create atomic vibrations that squander the electron's excess energy on heat.
The laser, working together with an external light source, makes use of the natural I atomic vibrations in silicon to amplify the pump-light as it passes through the chip.
Conventional optical lattice clocks cannot eliminate influences of electromagnetic waves released from grid walls surrounding the atoms, which disrupts the cycles of the atomic vibrations.
For instance, "the comparison of protein structures at ultra-cold versus room temperature allows the details of atomic vibrations to be separated from structural disorders," says Helliwell.
Others believed, as did physicist Rudolf Peierls, that atomic vibrations and distortions trumped all.