atony


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atony

[′at·ən·ē]
(medicine)
Absence or extremely low degree of tonus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Compressive sutures to treat postpartum bleeding secondary to uterine atony. Obstet Gynecol.
[6] The identification of the risk factors for POUR may help reduce the chances of postoperative urinary infection, urinary bladder atony, and urosepsis, as well as reduce the length of hospital stay.
This condition should always be considered in case of symptomatic patients without uterine atony. An MDCT examination is necessary to evaluate the presence and the extension of hematomas and to identify any possible source of active bleeding (16).
Conclusion: Uterine atony and morbidly adherent placenta were the main reasons for emergency obstetric hysterectomy (EOH) in our set up.
While uterine atony is the most common cause of PPH after vaginal delivery, and it is recommended to always commence an oxytocin infusion as the first line of treatment, it is also important to consider other causes.
In our first patient who received Karateke packing, bilateral hypogastric artery ligation, and B-Lynch suture were performed via laparotomy due to postpartum uterine atony and there was no intra-operative bleeding.
After consuming the product, the animal presented diarrhea, characterized by liquid, brownish, and greasy feces; oligodipsia; hyporexia; mild dehydration; and ruminal atony. Treatment with fluid therapy and restitution of the ruminal flora was administered; however, there was no clinical improvement, and over a period of 4 days the animal experienced severe apathy, dehydration (12%), sternal recumbency, and finally death.
Those 4 women who failed to respond to tranxamic acid, 2 patients had venous thrombosis, 1 case was of placenta increate and 1 case was of uterine atony. Life saving total abdominal hysterectomy was performed in case of placenta increate.
Hence, resulting in less availability of glucose and calcium to uterine muscular tissues which proceeded as uterine atony and culminated to retained placenta (Mohanty et al., 1994).
More than 70% of these deaths occur post partum, and most are due to uterine atony, which results from poor contraction of the uterus after childbirth.
Other indications were uterine atony 6 (19.4%) and uterine rupture 3 (9.7%).
The main etiology for severe PPH was uterine atony (65%) followed by vaginal tearing (15%).