atony


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atony

[′at·ən·ē]
(medicine)
Absence or extremely low degree of tonus.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a descriptive study in Egypt by H Abdul Aleem and colleagues, out of 18 women with severe hemorrhage because of atony, 16 had responded to misoprostol (88.
The most common indication of EOH in our study was uterine atony (60%) followed by morbidly adherent placenta (20%) and uterine rupture (20%).
The predominant cause of MT was uterine atony (mostly due to multiple gestation, uterine leiomyomas, and chorioamnionitis) throughout the 10-year period, which accounted for 55% of the MTs, followed by placental abnormalities (placenta previa, placenta accreta, and placental abruption) at 29%, laceration (uterine rupture) at 11%, and coagulation dysfunction (amniotic embolism) at 5%.
In grand multiparas due to decrease in muscular tissues and increase in fibrous tissues of uterus, uterine atony is more common.
The doctor's theatre notes on the CD were frequently of such poor quality that it was not possible to ascertain estimated blood loss, whether the surgeon had found uterine atony, uterine tears or placental site bleeding, what uterotonics were given, whether vaginal bleeding from uterine atony was looked for before wound closure, or the skill of the operator.
Everton kicked off their preparations with a short flight to Copenhagen - aTony - a lively experience in itself with notoriously bad-flier Paul Rideout mercilessly taunted and ribbed by his team-mates at every hint of gentle turbulence - then enjoyed a picturesque catamaran crossing to Helsingborg.
Systemic signs include sudden onset, high fever, marked depression, anorexia, sudden drop in milk production, ruminal atony, rapid pulse and respiratory rates, weakness and sunken eyes.
REM sleep behavior disorder is represented with an increased motor movement caused by the lack of atony, which is supposed to exist during the REM sleep.
Atony, morbidly adherent placenta, and uterine rupture were the three chief indications for the procedure [Table 3].
Known as uterine atony, this leaves the blood vessels fully dilated and allows unobstructed bleeding.
1) Postpartum bleeding is the main cause, and atony accounts for 70% of cases and continues to be the main trigger of massive postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) and complications due to coagulopathy.