atrium


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atrium

(ā`trēəm), term for an interior court in Roman domestic architecture and also for a type of entrance court in early Christian churches. The Roman atrium was an unroofed or partially roofed area with rooms opening from it. In early times its center held a cooking hearth. After the 2d cent. B.C., when the hearth was placed elsewhere, the center of the atrium held a tank (impluvium) to receive rainwater falling through the opening, which also furnished light to the surrounding rooms. In more luxurious and complex Roman dwellings, the private apartments had a court of their own, called the peristyle, and the atrium served merely as a semipublic reception hall. The ruins of Pompeii contain remains of atria in their various forms. In early Christian churches, the atrium was a large arcaded or colonnaded open court, serving as a general meeting place, in front of the church itself, with a fountain used for ablutions in its center. The basilican churches of Sant'Ambrogio in Milan and San Clemente in Rome have noteworthy atria. This type of large forecourt is also a characteristic element of the Muslim mosque. The term also refers to a modern building's central court, an often soaring interior space with a large skylight. Creating a flood of natural light and usually filled with plants, the feature has become practically ubiquitous in contemporary architecture; it is used predominantly in commercial buildings.

Atrium

The forecourt of an early Christian basilica, with colonnades on all four sides, and usually a fountain in the center. It was derived from the entrance court or hall of a Roman dwelling, roofed to leave a large opening to admit light. Rain was received in a cistern below. The modern version is a common vertical space with skylights in an office or hotel complex.

atrium

[′ā·trē·əm]
(anatomy)
The heart chamber that receives blood from the veins.
The main part of the tympanic cavity, below the malleus.
The external chamber to receive water from the gills in lancelets and tunicates.
(architecture)
An open court located within a building.

atrium

atrium, 2
atrium, 1
1.. The main hall of an ancient Roman house, containing an opening to the sky

atrium

1. the open main court of a Roman house
2. a central often glass-roofed hall that extends through several storeys in a building, such as a shopping centre or hotel
3. a court in front of an early Christian or medieval church, esp one flanked by colonnades
4. Anatomy a cavity or chamber in the body, esp the upper chamber of each half of the heart
References in periodicals archive ?
Prudent Development Pipeline: Fitch views Atrium's development pipeline as prudent, as activities are focussed on lower-risk brownfield extensions, staged investment commitments and pre-leasing hurdle rates (50%) before construction begins.
Prudent Development Pipeline: Fitch views Atrium's development pipeline as prudent, as activities are focussed on lower risk brownfield extensions, staged investment commitments and pre-leasing hurdle rates (50%) before construction begins.
Atrium Corporate Park is comprised of three Class A office buildings--300,400 and 500 Atrium Drive in Somerset, N.J.--totaling 679,251 square feet of office space.
Atrium's 'BBB-' Long-Term Issuer Default Rating (IDR) is unaffected by the refinancing.
Atrium's biosurgery business is engaged the development of biological, mechanical and therapeutic solutions for soft tissue reinforcement following trauma, surgery and other interventional procedures.
"We value Atrium's history as a highly successful company and welcome its 1,400 employees to the Nestle family.
Transthoracic two-dimensional echocardiography demonstrated a huge right atrium of about 6.2 cm and a volume of 230 ml/[m.sup.2], with a thick smoke pattern and mild tricuspid regurgitation.
Speaking for the first time over the issue, the architect has accused project managers of 'making design decisions unilaterally and without proper analysis.' His criticisms follow claims by architect Philip Singleton, chief executive of Millennium Point, that the new atrium design would resemble a 'Paul Smith suit with a Primark lining' with a 'crass and timid' restyling.
The critical review of the atrium house is marked by the rise of empiric inductive method (4) which derives the general principles through scrutinized analyses of cases.
The amount which may be drawn under the revolving operating credit facility is limited to the lesser of: (i) USD50m (subject to increase to USD75m when the bulge facility is available); 45% (or 50% when the bulge facility is available) of Atrium's shareholders' equity; and 50% of the value of qualified first mortgages.
M2 PHARMA-November 7, 2011-FTC okays Getinge acquisition of Atrium Medical(C)2011 M2 COMMUNICATIONS
Atrium signed an agreement to be acquired by Getinge Group and its subsidiary, Maquet Cardiovascular, a global company that focuses on cardiovascular technologies.