attachment


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Wikipedia.
Related to attachment: attachment disorder

attachment

1. 
a. the arrest of a person for disobedience to a court order
b. the lawful seizure of property and placing of it under control of a court
c. a writ authorizing such arrest or seizure
2. Law the binding of a debt in the hands of a garnishee until its disposition has been decided by the court

attachment

  1. the emotional bond between infant and mother.
  2. the types of behaviour displayed by the infant to indicate an attachment, e.g. following parents, crying, smiling.
  3. the more abstract psychological tie felt towards a nurturing figure involving a mutual dependency for emotional satisfaction.
A theory of attachment was first proposed by BOWLBY (1958,1969) who was primarily concerned with the first two interpretations, citing ethological evidence to support his claims about how human infants use certain types of behaviour to elicit psychological as well as physical care from their mothers. Attachment merely refers to whether the child has formed a tie to a caregiver, but more recently the notion of security of attachment (Ainsworth et al., Strange Situation Behaviour of One-year Olds, 1978) was established to assess the quality of the attachment relationship once it has been formed.

attachment

[ə′tach·mənt]
(computer science)
An additional file sent with an e-mail message.
(organic chemistry)
The conversion of a molecular entity into another molecular structure solely by formation of a single two-center bond with another molecular entity and no other changes in bonding.
(psychology)
The behavior of an individual who relates in an affiliative or dependent manner to another individual or object.
(virology)
The initial stage in the infection of a cell by a virus that follows a chance collision by the virus with a suitable receptor area on the cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
1978) delineated a three-pattern classification of infant-to-mother attachment styles: (a) secure infants (became agitated at their mothers' departure from the Strange-Situation room, were ecstatic on their mothers' return, and then settled down to explore the room); (b) insecure-anxious resistant/ambivalent infants (became distressed at their mothers' departure, remained agitated upon their mothers' return, and clung onto their mothers rather than venture into exploration of their environments); and (c) insecure-avoidant (were apathetic to both mother's departure and return).
This previous research on attachment has highlighted the role of the mother figure in parental attachment with children but has not sufficiently addressed father-child attachment (Ainsworth et al.
In addition, Brumariu and Kerns (2008) found that avoidant attachment decreased anxious and distressful emotions in novel social interaction environments.
Researchers seeking to understand how attachment influences social withdrawal (e.
Bartholomew (1990) established the four classification system for styles of attachment centered on four groupings attained through dividing the individual's intangible view of a person into negative (high dependency) or positive (low dependency) on one of the axis, whereas dividing the individuals' nonconcrete viewof another subject into negative (high evasion) or positive (low evasion) on the other axis.
Individuals with preoccupied attachment style have undergone unresponsive and inconsistent care-giving during the early stages of their lives.
Kirkpatrick (1999) posited that many Christians view themselves to be in relationship with God and there are, in fact, many similarities between this perceived relationship with God and child-caregiver attachment processes.
Indeed, attachment to God has proven to be a useful predictor of a number of diverse outcomes including coping, body image and well-being (e.
Rigid: Any attachment employing a mechanical locking action with the use of clasps, lingual arms, springs, ball and sockets etc.
Passive: An attachment that provides a free movement of the male when the abutment teeth are exposed to excessive forces.
As children begin to have more and more contact with the outside world and learn about the accessibility and responsiveness of their attachment figure, they start to build their internal working models (Bowlby, 1988).
During past three decades, attachment theory has been one of the most leading theories of social-emotional development in modern psychology stirring a great amount of research in the areas of developmental, clinical, and social psychology (Meyer and Pilkonis, 2001).