attention span


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Related to attention span: attention deficit disorder

attention span

[ə′ten·shən ‚span]
(psychology)
The period of time a person is able to concentrate his attentions on a given item, usually with respect to learning.
References in periodicals archive ?
A study involving Suzuki method violin students examined on-task and off-task behaviors to see if attention span differed with various types of instruction.
Perhaps the return of the serial will help us recover and hone our civic attention spans and memories.
This is why Burst, the London based micro-content specialist agency is launching to service brands eager to reach a new generation of consumers with short attention spans.
Those who had the 20mg zinc supplement improved visual memory by 12 per cent, word recognition by nine and attention span by six.
The works" appearance and disappearance made for an obvious commentary on our attention span (especially when it comes to contemporary art), but Parreno's careful choreography implied, or at least involved, something more.
Americans with a modicum of historical memory, and an attention span longer than the typical Sean Hannity soundbite, might hear in Rabee's angry words echoes of our ill-fated occupation of Somalia, another "humanitarian" invasion that degenerated into a chaotic bloodbath after "mission creep" set in.
The 24 year old slammed the Manchester United player as the wrong man to father a child and questioned his attention span as a dad.
My brother, who's spent almost all his working life in network television, says executives there figure the attention span of the average audience to be seven seconds.
If psychologists are right in saying that tuning out is the child's way of regulating his own orderly acquisition of competencies, then artificially tinkering with the child's attention span could be disastrous.
This concentration is not considered life-threatening, but it can affect IQ, attention span, and ability to learn, says Baker.
Imagine someone who has a short attention span, is barely literate, and woefully inept in arithmetic but who somehow excels in nuclear physics
As many as 1 in 20 school-age children are estimated to have the disorder, which includes a limited attention span, constant fidgeting and moving about, and frequent impulsive and disruptive acts.

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