attrition


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Related to attrition: Attrition bias

attrition

1. Geography the grinding down of rock particles by friction during transportation by water, wind, or ice
2. Theol sorrow for sin arising from fear of damnation, esp as contrasted with contrition, which arises purely from love of God

attrition

[ə′trish·ən]
(geology)
The act of wearing and smoothing of rock surfaces by the flow of water charged with sand and gravel, by the passage of sand drifts, or by the movement of glaciers.
(materials)
Wear caused by rubbing or friction. For metal surfaces, also known as scoring; scouring.

attrition

A loss or weakening. Attrition often refers to a reduction of employees in an organization due to resignation, retirement and death. See attrition rate.
References in periodicals archive ?
An attrition rate of 42 per cent after eight years of nursing and an attrition rate of 10 per cent after the first year of practice--should the profession be concerned?
Once nursing applicants are accepted into a nursing program, issues with attrition and the ability to retain students become the focus for graduating new registered nurses.
To calculate ART attrition from pharmacy data, ART refill due dates were defined for every interval between pharmacy visits, based on dispense dates and number of dose-days dispensed.
We do not find a consistent pattern of differences in attrition rates between KIPP and district schools (see Figure 2).
The year before, in 2012, the FDIC had an attrition rate of 6.2% with 123 examiners leaving the agency.
One evaluation of Navy recruits from FY95-FY96 revealed that waivered sailors have significantly higher rates of "unsuitability attrition." In addition, the study found that those who are both waivered and have not completed a high school degree are the most likely to attrite for "unsuitable" reasons (Hall 1999).
Hay Group's Wendell D'Cunha, the author of the report, said:"The combination of a shortage of national talent and a focus from employers on pay as the main driver of employee retention is contributing to a high attrition rate.
Unofficial statistics and first-hand experience peg attrition rate in the industry at an average of 30 percent, meaning three out of 10 homebuyers would discontinue his or her purchase.
9335 or the Lateral Attrition Law was enacted in 2005 to boost revenue collection through an incentive system where tax collectors who exceed expectations are given incentives accordingly, whereas those who fall behind their targets are imposed penalties.
where [attrition.sub.t][m] is the attrition volume in year t for members having m YOS at the end of year t; and [population.sub.t][m] is the population with m YOS at the end of year t.
According to Superior's director of washing and classifying John Bennington, "The Attrition Mill's 50-hp engine produces the same capacities as similar machines with three times the power, providing operators a quieter and more energy-efficient process."