attrition rate


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attrition rate

[ə′trish·ən ‚rāt]
(ordnance)
A factor, normally expressed as a percentage, reflecting the degree of losses of personnel or nonconsumable supplies due to various causes within a specified period of time.

attrition rate

A rate, usually expressed as a percentage, reflecting the loss of personnel or equipment resulting from defined causes in a given period of time. Normally, the term refers to the aircraft attrition rate, which is calculated based on sorties flown during warlike operations or hours flown during peacetime operations.

attrition rate

The number of employees who retired or resigned in a given year compared with the average number of employed people. For example, if 100 people leave a department of 1,000, the attrition rate, or "turnover," is 10%. The term also applies to customers who stop subscribing to a service, which is typically called "churn rate." See attrition.
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The attrition rate for students at community colleges, even those students who are committed to pursue baccalaureate degrees, is greater than the attrition rate of students at four-year colleges.
Referring to implications of the attrition rate for undergraduate nursing education, Walker said some older nurses felt the degree education did not adequately prepare nurses for the more emotional aspects of nursing "and that, in particular, they don't build the social support structures necessary to carry them through the tough times at work".
Service specialist attrition rate is stable, averaging about 5 percent over the past five years and 5.
Attrition rates are important aspects of hotel contracts that can be altered due to the changing economy and societal tendencies.
The 43 percent attrition rate of the basic online statistics course is higher than that of any other course in the study and may have a lot to do with campus enrollment in the advanced statistics course being higher than the online counterpart.
3 Just as the earlier three-country National Research Council study found, our data suggest that there is a statistically measurable increment to the worker attrition rate associated with HIV infection, but the magnitude of the effect continues to be extremely small, perhaps less than half what would be predicted based on national seroprevalence.
In addition, to simulate natural selection pressures, he varied the survival and attrition rates of the new DNA sequences.
In heap-leach conditions attrition rate can be based upon carbon lost per ton of solution processed, carbon lost per ton carbon-stripped, or carbon lost per ounce gold-produced.
Dr Sameer Malhotra, head of psychiatry at Max Healtcare, said: " In any organisation, attrition rate depends on the quality of life.
Why do so many Maori and Pacific nursing and midwifery students fail to complete their studies, with the highest attrition rates occurring during the first year of the degree programmes?
The attrition rate in nursing programs at four-year schools is even lower, 10.
1% attrition rate so far this year, according to the NCUA.