audio image

audio image

[′ȯd·ē·ō ‚im·ij]
(acoustics)
A sound that originates, or appears to originate, at a certain point in space.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
For file transfer, the device has integrated Bluetooth connectivity and can be paired with a headset to record and play back audio image annotations hands-free.
According to the post, messages should help paint an audio image of a company's brand, including the company's slogans, latest news, products and current promotions.
Grab a few more Rocketfish Rocketboost units and you can not only boost the rear audio image from 5.1 to 7.1, but also network your whole house with wireless music, as Rocketfish also offer an outdoor speaker set that's perfect for parties.
Digital audio image restoration: Introducing a new approach to the reproduction and restoration of analog optical soundtracks for motion picture films.
I'm hearing things I don't hear on my system." By the end of an hour, after we'd talked about the system's superior equalization and its ability to create the "audio image" of being in the room with the musicians, Ralph summed up his position: "I want this in my car!
The solution ( Audio Image, a new concept night at Stereo near the Quayside, sponsored by Donut clothing.
WOW compensates for the limitations inherent in the smaller speakers that are usually found in televisions by providing a panoramic audio image that extends the sound in both the vertical and horizontal planes and creates the perception of deep rich bass.
So here come the staggering range of oddball voices and bad-joke names popping out of corners of the audio image; the dissolves and cross-fades and collages and jump-cuts mimicking channel-surfing; the endless reams of wince-able puns.
We know the words love, justice, and mercy to represent an order of reality, even though they attach to no specific visual or audio image, even though they occupy no space at any specific time.
A DARPA media-forensics team is creating tools that, in theory, can automatically detect when video or audio images have been altered.